Heat treatment increases the incidence of alopecia areata in the C3H/HeJ mouse model

Tongyu Wikramanayake, Elizabeth Alvarez-Connelly, Jessica Simon, Lucia M. Mauro, Javier Guzman, George Elgart, Lawrence A Schachner, Juan Chen, Lisa R. Plano, Joaquin J Jimenez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Alopecia areata (AA) is a common autoimmune disease characterized by non-scarring hair loss. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between AA and physiological/psychological stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of heat treatment, a physiological stress, on AA development in C3H/HeJ mice. Whereas this strain of mice are predisposed to AA at low incidence by 18 months of age, we observed a significant increase in the incidence of hair loss in heat-treated 8-month-old C3H/HeJ mice compared with sham-treated mice. Histological analysis detected mononuclear cell infiltration in anagen hair follicles, a characteristic of AA, in heat-treated mouse skin. As expected, increased expression of induced HSPA1A/B (formerly called HSP70i) was detected in skin samples from heat-treated mice. Importantly, increased HSPA1A/B expression was also detected in skin samples from C3H/HeJ mice that developed AA spontaneously. Our results suggest that induction of HSPA1A/B may precipitate the development of AA in C3H/HeJ mice. For future studies, the C3H/HeJ mice with heat treatment may prove a useful model to investigate stress response in AA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)985-991
Number of pages7
JournalCell Stress and Chaperones
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Fingerprint

Alopecia Areata
Inbred C3H Mouse
Skin
Hot Temperature
Heat treatment
Incidence
Infiltration
Precipitates
Alopecia
Therapeutics
Physiological Stress
Hair Follicle
Psychological Stress
Autoimmune Diseases

Keywords

  • Alopecia areata
  • C3H/HeJ
  • Heat shock
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Heat treatment increases the incidence of alopecia areata in the C3H/HeJ mouse model. / Wikramanayake, Tongyu; Alvarez-Connelly, Elizabeth; Simon, Jessica; Mauro, Lucia M.; Guzman, Javier; Elgart, George; Schachner, Lawrence A; Chen, Juan; Plano, Lisa R.; Jimenez, Joaquin J.

In: Cell Stress and Chaperones, Vol. 15, No. 6, 01.11.2010, p. 985-991.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wikramanayake, Tongyu ; Alvarez-Connelly, Elizabeth ; Simon, Jessica ; Mauro, Lucia M. ; Guzman, Javier ; Elgart, George ; Schachner, Lawrence A ; Chen, Juan ; Plano, Lisa R. ; Jimenez, Joaquin J. / Heat treatment increases the incidence of alopecia areata in the C3H/HeJ mouse model. In: Cell Stress and Chaperones. 2010 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. 985-991.
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