Health risk and protective factors among hispanic women living in the U.S.-Mexico border region

Joseph De Santis, Elias Provencio-Vasquez, Bibiana Mancera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As the Hispanic population continues to flourish in areas such the U.S.-Mexico border region, more attention needs to be focused on health factors among Hispanics. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine what specific health protective and health risk factors exist among Mexican/Mexican American women residing along the U.S.-Mexico border and (2) to determine the relationship between the protective and risk factors among these women. A sample of Mexican/Mexican American women (N = 98) participated in a structured interview that collected data on familism, Hispanic stress, depression, violence, and sexual risk and demographic variables. Religious factors had the largest influence on the health risk behaviors of alcohol intoxication and drug intoxication (p < .05), while familism influenced only condom use (p = .002) and a lifetime history of intimate partner violence (p = .039). Health care access also influenced the health risks of alcohol intoxication (p = .013), drug intoxication (p = .012), and condom use (p = .019). The study's results provide implications for clinical care and directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-25
Number of pages9
JournalHispanic Health Care International
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Mexico
Hispanic Americans
Health
Alcoholic Intoxication
Condoms
Sex Offenses
Risk-Taking
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Demography
Protective Factors
Interviews
Depression
Delivery of Health Care
Population

Keywords

  • Health
  • Hispanics
  • Latinos
  • Mexican American
  • Protective factors
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Health risk and protective factors among hispanic women living in the U.S.-Mexico border region. / De Santis, Joseph; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias; Mancera, Bibiana.

In: Hispanic Health Care International, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 17-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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