Health insurance coverage of immigrants living in the United States

Differences by citizenship status and country of origin

Olveen Carrasquillo, Angeles I. Carrasquillo, Steven Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

192 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. This study examined health insurance coverage among immigrants who are not US citizens and among individuals from the 16 countries with the largest number of immigrants living in the United States. Methods. We analyzed data from the 1998 Current Population Survey, using logistic regression to standardize rates of employer-sponsored coverage by country of origin. Results. In 1997, 16.7 million immigrants were not US citizens. Among noncitizens, 43% of children and 12% of elders lacked health insurance, compared with 14% of nonimmigrant children and 1% of nonimmigrant elders. Approximately 50% of noncitizen full-time workers had employer- sponsored coverage, compared with 81% of nonimmigrant full-time workers. Immigrants from Guatemala, Mexico, El Salvador, Haiti, Korea, and Vietnam were the most likely to be uninsured. Among immigrants who worked full time, sociodemographic and employment characteristics accounted for most of the variation in employer health insurance. For Central American immigrants, legal status may play a role in high uninsurance rates. Conclusions. Immigrants who are not US citizens are much less likely to receive employer- sponsored health insurance or government coverage; 44% are uninsured. Ongoing debates on health insurance reform and efforts to improve coverage will need to focus attention on this group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)917-923
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume90
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Insurance Coverage
Health Insurance
El Salvador
Haiti
Guatemala
Vietnam
Jurisprudence
Korea
Mexico
Logistic Models
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Health insurance coverage of immigrants living in the United States : Differences by citizenship status and country of origin. / Carrasquillo, Olveen; Carrasquillo, Angeles I.; Shea, Steven.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 90, No. 6, 01.06.2000, p. 917-923.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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