Health economics perspective of the components of the cardiometabolic syndrome

Leonardo Tamariz, Ana M Palacio, Yadong Yang, Donald Parris, Rami Ben-Joseph, Hermes J Florez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The components of the cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) increase the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). The authors compared 12-month costs of subjects with different number of components of the CMS. In claims data from a large health benefits company, 383,420 individuals with the first International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for hypertension, diabetes, lipid abnormalities, and obesity were identified. Patients were stratified according to presence of CAD and the number of components of the CMS. Twelve-month costs were added after the identification of the risk factor. Mean annual costs increased with the number of components of CMS both in those with and without CAD, even after adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities (P<.01). Similar trends were seen for medical and pharmacy costs. The adjusted total annual health care cost in those with an isolated component of the CMS was $5564 (95% confidence interval: $5491-$5631) while in those with 4 components was $12,287 (95% confidence interval: $11,987-$12,587). Individuals with accumulating components of the CMS have higher health care costs regardless of age, sex, and other comorbidities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)549-555
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of clinical hypertension
Volume12
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

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Economics
Health
Costs and Cost Analysis
Coronary Artery Disease
Health Care Costs
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
International Classification of Diseases
Insurance Benefits
Obesity
Hypertension
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Health economics perspective of the components of the cardiometabolic syndrome. / Tamariz, Leonardo; Palacio, Ana M; Yang, Yadong; Parris, Donald; Ben-Joseph, Rami; Florez, Hermes J.

In: Journal of clinical hypertension, Vol. 12, No. 7, 01.07.2010, p. 549-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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