Health disparities and culturally specific treatment: Perspectives and expectancies of African American smokers

Monica S. Webb, Joan Francis, Bill C. Hines, Frankie B. Quarles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Researchers suggest that culturally specific (CS) interventions are important in addressing smoking-related health disparities. Yet, little research has examined the perspectives of African American smokers regarding these efforts. This qualitative study sought to gain insight into perceptions related to (a) the smoking prevalence among African Americans, (b) smoking-related health disparities, (c) expectancies for CS interventions, (d) methods of recruiting research participants, and (e) key intervention components. Six focus groups were conducted with 41 African American smokers (aged 21-64) at a community health center. Content analyses revealed several themes, including the perception that smoking is normative among African Americans, limited knowledge of racial health disparities, mixed perceptions regarding race as a risk factor for illness, and mixed expectancies for the efficacy of CS interventions. In conclusion, individual differences, such as smoking norms, knowledge of health disparities, and intervention expectations may influence receptivity to CS treatments. Implications for tobacco interventions among African Americans are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-583
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume63
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007

Keywords

  • African American smokers
  • Culturally specific interventions
  • Expectancies
  • Focus groups
  • Health disparities
  • Qualitative research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

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