Health correlates of co-occurring substance use for women with HIV in cocaine use recovery

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The goal of this study was to examine clinical correlates of alcohol, opioid, cannabis, sedative, or other co-occurring substance use disorders in a sample of 124 HIV. + women in recovery from cocaine use disorders. Methods: Data was collected from a baseline assessment for a randomized trial comparing a family therapy intervention to a health promotion group intervention. Substance use disorders were assessed with a computer-administered structured diagnostic interview. Psychological distress was measured with the Brief Symptom Inventory. Sleep problems were measured with the Short Sleep Index from the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Rating Scales. Pain was assessed with items from the Medical Outcomes Study-HIV scale. HIV health was assessed with blood tests for T-cell count and HIV Viral Load Suppression, as well as a nurse-administered symptom assessment. Results: Women with a co-occurring opioid use disorder were significantly more likely to have psychological distress and sleep problems, but less likely to have severe pain. Even though there was no difference in T-cell count or Viral Load, women with opioid use disorder were significantly more likely to have high HIV symptoms. Conclusions: Women in recovery with HIV who have co-occurring cocaine use and opioid use disorders were more likely to have several indicators of worse mental and physical health. Interventions may need to be tailored to meet the needs of this subgroup of women. Future research should examine whether these co-occurring conditions are associated with greater likelihood of relapse or poor treatment response, and whether this higher-risk profile exists in other groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-728
Number of pages4
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014

Fingerprint

Cocaine
Opioid Analgesics
Health
HIV
Recovery
T-cells
Sleep
Viral Load
Substance-Related Disorders
Cannabis
Cell Count
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Psychology
T-Lymphocytes
Pain
Family Therapy
Blood
Symptom Assessment
Alcohols
Hematologic Tests

Keywords

  • Cocaine
  • Comorbidity
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Opioids
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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title = "Health correlates of co-occurring substance use for women with HIV in cocaine use recovery",
abstract = "Background: The goal of this study was to examine clinical correlates of alcohol, opioid, cannabis, sedative, or other co-occurring substance use disorders in a sample of 124 HIV. + women in recovery from cocaine use disorders. Methods: Data was collected from a baseline assessment for a randomized trial comparing a family therapy intervention to a health promotion group intervention. Substance use disorders were assessed with a computer-administered structured diagnostic interview. Psychological distress was measured with the Brief Symptom Inventory. Sleep problems were measured with the Short Sleep Index from the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Rating Scales. Pain was assessed with items from the Medical Outcomes Study-HIV scale. HIV health was assessed with blood tests for T-cell count and HIV Viral Load Suppression, as well as a nurse-administered symptom assessment. Results: Women with a co-occurring opioid use disorder were significantly more likely to have psychological distress and sleep problems, but less likely to have severe pain. Even though there was no difference in T-cell count or Viral Load, women with opioid use disorder were significantly more likely to have high HIV symptoms. Conclusions: Women in recovery with HIV who have co-occurring cocaine use and opioid use disorders were more likely to have several indicators of worse mental and physical health. Interventions may need to be tailored to meet the needs of this subgroup of women. Future research should examine whether these co-occurring conditions are associated with greater likelihood of relapse or poor treatment response, and whether this higher-risk profile exists in other groups.",
keywords = "Cocaine, Comorbidity, HIV/AIDS, Opioids, Women",
author = "Brian McCabe and Feaster, {Daniel J} and Victoria Mitrani",
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AU - McCabe, Brian

AU - Feaster, Daniel J

AU - Mitrani, Victoria

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N2 - Background: The goal of this study was to examine clinical correlates of alcohol, opioid, cannabis, sedative, or other co-occurring substance use disorders in a sample of 124 HIV. + women in recovery from cocaine use disorders. Methods: Data was collected from a baseline assessment for a randomized trial comparing a family therapy intervention to a health promotion group intervention. Substance use disorders were assessed with a computer-administered structured diagnostic interview. Psychological distress was measured with the Brief Symptom Inventory. Sleep problems were measured with the Short Sleep Index from the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Rating Scales. Pain was assessed with items from the Medical Outcomes Study-HIV scale. HIV health was assessed with blood tests for T-cell count and HIV Viral Load Suppression, as well as a nurse-administered symptom assessment. Results: Women with a co-occurring opioid use disorder were significantly more likely to have psychological distress and sleep problems, but less likely to have severe pain. Even though there was no difference in T-cell count or Viral Load, women with opioid use disorder were significantly more likely to have high HIV symptoms. Conclusions: Women in recovery with HIV who have co-occurring cocaine use and opioid use disorders were more likely to have several indicators of worse mental and physical health. Interventions may need to be tailored to meet the needs of this subgroup of women. Future research should examine whether these co-occurring conditions are associated with greater likelihood of relapse or poor treatment response, and whether this higher-risk profile exists in other groups.

AB - Background: The goal of this study was to examine clinical correlates of alcohol, opioid, cannabis, sedative, or other co-occurring substance use disorders in a sample of 124 HIV. + women in recovery from cocaine use disorders. Methods: Data was collected from a baseline assessment for a randomized trial comparing a family therapy intervention to a health promotion group intervention. Substance use disorders were assessed with a computer-administered structured diagnostic interview. Psychological distress was measured with the Brief Symptom Inventory. Sleep problems were measured with the Short Sleep Index from the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Rating Scales. Pain was assessed with items from the Medical Outcomes Study-HIV scale. HIV health was assessed with blood tests for T-cell count and HIV Viral Load Suppression, as well as a nurse-administered symptom assessment. Results: Women with a co-occurring opioid use disorder were significantly more likely to have psychological distress and sleep problems, but less likely to have severe pain. Even though there was no difference in T-cell count or Viral Load, women with opioid use disorder were significantly more likely to have high HIV symptoms. Conclusions: Women in recovery with HIV who have co-occurring cocaine use and opioid use disorders were more likely to have several indicators of worse mental and physical health. Interventions may need to be tailored to meet the needs of this subgroup of women. Future research should examine whether these co-occurring conditions are associated with greater likelihood of relapse or poor treatment response, and whether this higher-risk profile exists in other groups.

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