Health Correlates of Abuse History and Moderating Effect of Parenting Stress for Mothers with Mental Disorders

Jessica Williams, Brian E. McCabe, Lila de Tantillo, Kristin Levoy, Victoria Behar-Zusman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Parenting stress is common and may lead to worsening health, particularly in the context of other risk factors such as mental disorders or a history of abuse. This study investigated how parenting-related stress impacts the effect of abuse experiences on health among mothers with mental health disorders. Survey data was analyzed from 172 predominantly Hispanic mothers receiving outpatient behavioral health services. Most (80.2%) mothers had experienced abuse. Those reporting childhood abuse had 3.82 greater odds of experiencing abuse in adulthood. Findings demonstrated worse health outcomes among those experiencing abuse in both childhood and adulthood and those with a greater number of abuse experiences. Caregiving load intensified the relationship between abuse and anxiety and sleep disturbance. Parenting self-agency intensified the relationship between abuse and cigarette use. These findings have important implications for mental health nursing practice by identifying parenting-stress as an important target for interventions to improve health among women with histories of abuse and mental health disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalIssues in Mental Health Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

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