Hair growth inhibition by heparin in mice

a model system for studying the modulation of epithelial cell growth by glycosaminoglycans?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although it is known that glycosaminoglycans (GAG) can affect hair growth, their role in follicular growth regulation is not yet understood. We have administered one such GAG. heparin, to anagen‐induced mice to help to elucidate this role. using the C57 131‐6 model for murine hair growth studies. Heparin was found to exert dose‐ and hair cycle‐dependent, differential effects on skin epithelial cell functions. Intraperitoneal, but not topical application of heparin inhibited the development of anagen follicles in anagen‐induced mice as assessed by morphometry. When the skin of heparin‐treated mice was cultured in an organ culture assay. the epidermis showed a significant increase in the synthesis of arginine‐rich proteins (ARP). while epithelial bulb. but not epidermal cell proliferation was reduced in comparison with control skin. In mouse‐skin organ culture, the effects of direct administration of heparin to the medium on epithelial cell proliferation and ARP synthesis were dose‐dependent and varied (inhibition or stimulation of either parameter). depending on the stage of the hair cycle. the cell population in question (epidermal vs. epithelial bulb keratinocytes), and the length of incubation. PAM cell and mouse dermal papilla cell proliferation in vitro was inhibited by heparin. We conclude that heparin may be a useful tool for characterizing the role of GAG in epithelial cell biology and epithelial‐mesenchymal interactions in general, and in hair growth in particular.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)415-422
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Dermatology
Volume124
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Glycosaminoglycans
Hair
Heparin
Epithelial Cells
Growth
Skin
Organ Culture Techniques
Cell Proliferation
Keratinocytes
Epidermis
Cell Biology
Proteins
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

@article{eba98aa397434c84b7c950f2156e2c58,
title = "Hair growth inhibition by heparin in mice: a model system for studying the modulation of epithelial cell growth by glycosaminoglycans?",
abstract = "Although it is known that glycosaminoglycans (GAG) can affect hair growth, their role in follicular growth regulation is not yet understood. We have administered one such GAG. heparin, to anagen‐induced mice to help to elucidate this role. using the C57 131‐6 model for murine hair growth studies. Heparin was found to exert dose‐ and hair cycle‐dependent, differential effects on skin epithelial cell functions. Intraperitoneal, but not topical application of heparin inhibited the development of anagen follicles in anagen‐induced mice as assessed by morphometry. When the skin of heparin‐treated mice was cultured in an organ culture assay. the epidermis showed a significant increase in the synthesis of arginine‐rich proteins (ARP). while epithelial bulb. but not epidermal cell proliferation was reduced in comparison with control skin. In mouse‐skin organ culture, the effects of direct administration of heparin to the medium on epithelial cell proliferation and ARP synthesis were dose‐dependent and varied (inhibition or stimulation of either parameter). depending on the stage of the hair cycle. the cell population in question (epidermal vs. epithelial bulb keratinocytes), and the length of incubation. PAM cell and mouse dermal papilla cell proliferation in vitro was inhibited by heparin. We conclude that heparin may be a useful tool for characterizing the role of GAG in epithelial cell biology and epithelial‐mesenchymal interactions in general, and in hair growth in particular.",
author = "Ralf Paus",
year = "1991",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2133.1991.tb00618.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "124",
pages = "415--422",
journal = "British Journal of Dermatology",
issn = "0007-0963",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hair growth inhibition by heparin in mice

T2 - a model system for studying the modulation of epithelial cell growth by glycosaminoglycans?

AU - Paus, Ralf

PY - 1991/1/1

Y1 - 1991/1/1

N2 - Although it is known that glycosaminoglycans (GAG) can affect hair growth, their role in follicular growth regulation is not yet understood. We have administered one such GAG. heparin, to anagen‐induced mice to help to elucidate this role. using the C57 131‐6 model for murine hair growth studies. Heparin was found to exert dose‐ and hair cycle‐dependent, differential effects on skin epithelial cell functions. Intraperitoneal, but not topical application of heparin inhibited the development of anagen follicles in anagen‐induced mice as assessed by morphometry. When the skin of heparin‐treated mice was cultured in an organ culture assay. the epidermis showed a significant increase in the synthesis of arginine‐rich proteins (ARP). while epithelial bulb. but not epidermal cell proliferation was reduced in comparison with control skin. In mouse‐skin organ culture, the effects of direct administration of heparin to the medium on epithelial cell proliferation and ARP synthesis were dose‐dependent and varied (inhibition or stimulation of either parameter). depending on the stage of the hair cycle. the cell population in question (epidermal vs. epithelial bulb keratinocytes), and the length of incubation. PAM cell and mouse dermal papilla cell proliferation in vitro was inhibited by heparin. We conclude that heparin may be a useful tool for characterizing the role of GAG in epithelial cell biology and epithelial‐mesenchymal interactions in general, and in hair growth in particular.

AB - Although it is known that glycosaminoglycans (GAG) can affect hair growth, their role in follicular growth regulation is not yet understood. We have administered one such GAG. heparin, to anagen‐induced mice to help to elucidate this role. using the C57 131‐6 model for murine hair growth studies. Heparin was found to exert dose‐ and hair cycle‐dependent, differential effects on skin epithelial cell functions. Intraperitoneal, but not topical application of heparin inhibited the development of anagen follicles in anagen‐induced mice as assessed by morphometry. When the skin of heparin‐treated mice was cultured in an organ culture assay. the epidermis showed a significant increase in the synthesis of arginine‐rich proteins (ARP). while epithelial bulb. but not epidermal cell proliferation was reduced in comparison with control skin. In mouse‐skin organ culture, the effects of direct administration of heparin to the medium on epithelial cell proliferation and ARP synthesis were dose‐dependent and varied (inhibition or stimulation of either parameter). depending on the stage of the hair cycle. the cell population in question (epidermal vs. epithelial bulb keratinocytes), and the length of incubation. PAM cell and mouse dermal papilla cell proliferation in vitro was inhibited by heparin. We conclude that heparin may be a useful tool for characterizing the role of GAG in epithelial cell biology and epithelial‐mesenchymal interactions in general, and in hair growth in particular.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025797262&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025797262&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2133.1991.tb00618.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2133.1991.tb00618.x

M3 - Article

VL - 124

SP - 415

EP - 422

JO - British Journal of Dermatology

JF - British Journal of Dermatology

SN - 0007-0963

IS - 5

ER -