Habitat heterogeneity reflected in mesophotic reef sediments

D. K. Weinstein, James Klaus, T. B. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Modern reef sediments reflect the physical and chemical characteristics of the environment as well as the local reef fauna. Analysis of sedimentary reef facies can thus provide a powerful tool in interpreting ancient reef deposits. However, few studies have attempted to differentiate sedimentary facies in mesophotic coral ecosystems, low light habitats defined as residing 30-150. m below sea level. The low-angle shelf mesophotic coral ecosystem south of the northern U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) consists of reefs with different structural characteristics ideal for studying the relationship between habitat variability and sedimentary facies. Textural, compositional, and geochemical analyses of surface sediments were used to identify mesophotic reef subfacies associated with distinct benthic communities and structural habitats. Sediment grain composition and bulk geochemistry were found to broadly record the distribution and abundance of coral and macroalgae communities, foundational mesophotic reef benthic organisms. Overall, sediment composition was found to be a good indicator of specific reef environments in low-angle mesophotic reef habitats. Sedimentological analyses indicate that hydrodynamic forces do not transport a significant amount of allochthonous sediment or potentially harmful terrigenous material to USVI mesophotic reefs. Episodic, maximum current velocities prevented deposition of most silt-size grains and smaller, but biological processes were found to have a greater influence on subfacies partitioning than hydrodynamic processes. Results provide a new analog for studies of ancient mesophotic coral ecosystem geological history and document the relationship between mesophotic reef subfacies, structural complexity, and habitat heterogeneity. They also demonstrate how mesophotic reefs along the same shelf system do not always share similar sedimentary characteristics and thus record a diverse set of ecological and environmental conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-187
Number of pages11
JournalSedimentary Geology
Volume329
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Fingerprint

reef
habitat
sediment
coral
ecosystem
hydrodynamic force
current velocity
biological processes
benthos
silt
partitioning
grain size
geochemistry
hydrodynamics
environmental conditions
sea level
fauna
history

Keywords

  • Bioerosion
  • Mesophotic coral reefs
  • Sedimentary facies
  • Stable isotopic analysis
  • U.S. Virgin islands

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology
  • Stratigraphy

Cite this

Habitat heterogeneity reflected in mesophotic reef sediments. / Weinstein, D. K.; Klaus, James; Smith, T. B.

In: Sedimentary Geology, Vol. 329, 01.11.2015, p. 177-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weinstein, D. K. ; Klaus, James ; Smith, T. B. / Habitat heterogeneity reflected in mesophotic reef sediments. In: Sedimentary Geology. 2015 ; Vol. 329. pp. 177-187.
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