H7N3 avian influenza virus found in a South American wild duck is related to the Chilean 2002 poultry outbreak, contains genes from equine and North American wild bird lineages, and is adapted to domestic turkeys

Erica Spackman, Kevin G. McCracken, Kevin Winker, David E. Swayne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

An H7N3 avian influenza virus (AIV) was isolated from a Cinnamon Teal (Anas cyanoptera) (A/CinnamonTeal/Bolivia/4537/01) during a survey of wild waterfowl in Bolivia in 2001. The NA and M genes had the greatest identity with North American wild bird isolates, the NS was most closely related to an equine virus, and the remaining genes were most closely related to isolates from an outbreak of H7N3 in commercial poultry in Chile in 2002. The HA protein cleavage site and the results of pathogenesis studies in chickens were consistent with a low-pathogenicity virus, and the infective dose was 10 5 times higher for chickens than turkeys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7760-7764
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of virology
Volume80
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

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