Gut-induced inflammation during development may compromise the blood-brain barrier and predispose to autism spectrum disorder

Rebecca S. Eshraghi, Camron Davies, Rahul Iyengar, Linda Perez, Rahul Mittal, Adrien A. Eshraghi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recently, the gut microbiome has gained considerable interest as one of the major contribu-tors to the pathogenesis of multi-system inflammatory disorders. Several studies have suggested that the gut microbiota plays a role in modulating complex signaling pathways, predominantly via the bidirectional gut-brain-axis (GBA). Subsequent in vivo studies have demonstrated the direct role of altered gut microbes and metabolites in the progression of neurodevelopmental diseases. This review will discuss the most recent advancements in our understanding of the gut microbiome’s clinical significance in regulating blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, immunological function, and neurobiological development. In particular, we address the potentially causal role of GBA dysregu-lation in the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) through compromising the BBB and immunological abnormalities. A thorough understanding of the complex signaling interactions between gut microbes, metabolites, neural development, immune mediators, and neurobiological functionality will facilitate the development of targeted therapeutic modalities to better understand, prevent, and treat ASD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number27
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Blood-brain barrier
  • Gastrointestinal problems
  • Gut microbiota
  • Gut-brain axis
  • Immunological mediators
  • Inflammation
  • Neuroinflammation
  • Short chain fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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