Growth variation in larval Makaira nigricans

S. Sponaugle, K. L. Denit, S. A. Luthy, J. E. Serafy, R. K. Cowen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Atlantic blue marlin Makaira nigricans larvae were collected from Exuma Sound, Bahamas and the Straits of Florida over three summers (2000-2002). Sagittal otoliths were extracted and read under light microscopy to determine relationships between standard length (LS) and age for larvae from each year and location. Otolith growth trajectories were significantly different between locations: after the first 5-6 days of life, larvae from Exuma Sound grew significantly faster than larvae from the Straits of Florida. Exponential regression coefficients were similar among years for Exuma Sound larvae (mean instantaneous growth rate, GL = 0.125), but differed between years for larvae from the Straits of Florida (GL = 0.086-0.089). Differences in larval growth rates between locations resulted in a 4-6 mm difference in LS by day 15 of larval life. These differences in growth appeared to be unrelated to mean ambient water temperatures, and may have been caused by location-specific differences in prey composition or availability. Alternatively, population-specific differences in maternal condition may have contributed to these differences in early larval growth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)822-835
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Fish Biology
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

larva
larvae
strait
otolith
otoliths
Bahamas
trajectories
Makaira nigricans
light microscopy
microscopy
ambient temperature
water temperature
trajectory
summer

Keywords

  • Age and growth
  • Billfish larvae
  • Exuma Sound
  • Istiophoridae
  • Otoliths
  • Straits of Florida

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Sponaugle, S., Denit, K. L., Luthy, S. A., Serafy, J. E., & Cowen, R. K. (2005). Growth variation in larval Makaira nigricans. Journal of Fish Biology, 66(3), 822-835. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.2005.00657.x

Growth variation in larval Makaira nigricans. / Sponaugle, S.; Denit, K. L.; Luthy, S. A.; Serafy, J. E.; Cowen, R. K.

In: Journal of Fish Biology, Vol. 66, No. 3, 01.03.2005, p. 822-835.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sponaugle, S, Denit, KL, Luthy, SA, Serafy, JE & Cowen, RK 2005, 'Growth variation in larval Makaira nigricans', Journal of Fish Biology, vol. 66, no. 3, pp. 822-835. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.2005.00657.x
Sponaugle S, Denit KL, Luthy SA, Serafy JE, Cowen RK. Growth variation in larval Makaira nigricans. Journal of Fish Biology. 2005 Mar 1;66(3):822-835. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.2005.00657.x
Sponaugle, S. ; Denit, K. L. ; Luthy, S. A. ; Serafy, J. E. ; Cowen, R. K. / Growth variation in larval Makaira nigricans. In: Journal of Fish Biology. 2005 ; Vol. 66, No. 3. pp. 822-835.
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