Greater right frontal EEG asymmetry and nonemphathic behavior are observed in children prenatally exposed to cocaine

Nancy Aaron Jones, Tiffany Field, Marisabel Davalos, Sybil Hart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Responses to emotion-inducing stimuli were examined in 27, 3- to 6-year-old children, who were prenatally exposed to cocaine, and 27 unexposed controls. Children were monitored for EEG activity and their affect during an infant crying, simulated maternal distress, and a mildly frustrating task. Multivariate analyses indicated that the cocaine-exposed children had greater right frontal EEG asymmetry, showed fewer empathic reactions to a crying infant as well as to their own mothers, and they were less proficient in completing a cooperative task. These findings highlight the need for continued longitudinal research on the effects of early drug exposure for later socioemotional development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-480
Number of pages22
JournalInternational Journal of Neuroscience
Volume114
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

Keywords

  • Cocaine use
  • EEG
  • Emotions
  • Empathy
  • Frustration
  • Preschoolers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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