Greater regional cortical thickness is associated with selective vulnerability to atrophy in Alzheimer's disease, independent of amyloid load and APOE genotype

Chunfei Li, Ranjan Duara, David A. Loewenstein, Walter Izquierdo, Mercedes Cabrerizo, Warren Barker, Malek Adjouadi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Regional cortical thickness (rCTh) among cognitively normal (CN) adults (rCTh CN) varies greatly between brain regions, as does the vulnerability to neurodegeneration. Objective: The goal of this study was to: 1) rank order rCTh CN for various brain regions, and 2) explore their vulnerability to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) within these brain regions. Methods: The relationship between rCTh among the CN group (rCTh CN) and the percent difference in CTh (% CTh Diff) in each region between the CN group and AD patients was examined. Pearson correlation analysis was performed accounting for amyloid-β (Aβ) protein and APOE genotype using 210 age, gender, and APOE matched CN (n=105, age range: 56-90) and AD (n=105, age range: 56-90) ADNI participants. Results: Strong positive correlations were observed between rCTh CN and % CTh Diff accounting for Aβ deposition and APOE status. Regions, such as the entorhinal cortex, which had the greatest CTh in the CN state, were also the regions which had the greatest % CTh Diff. Conclusions: Regions with the greatest CTh at the CN stage are found to aggregate in disease prone regions of AD, namely in the medial temporal lobe, including the temporal pole, ERC, parahippocampal gyrus, fusiform and the middle and inferior temporal gyrus. Although rCTh has been found to vary considerably across the different regions of the brain, our results indicate that regions with the greatest CTh at the CN stage are actually regions which have been found to be most vulnerable to neurodegeneration in AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-156
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume69
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • APOE
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • amyloid-β
  • cortical atrophy
  • neuroimaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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