Global dynamics of a delayed within-host viral infection model with both virus-to-cell and cell-to-cell transmissions

Yu Yang, Lan Zou, Shigui Ruan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

106 Scopus citations

Abstract

A within-host viral infection model with both virus-to-cell and cell-to-cell transmissions and three distributed delays is investigated, in which the first distributed delay describes the intracellular latency for the virus-to-cell infection, the second delay represents the intracellular latency for the cell-to-cell infection, and the third delay describes the time period that viruses penetrated into cells and infected cells release new virions. The global stability analysis of the model is carried out in terms of the basic reproduction number R0. If R0≤1, the infection-free (semi-trivial) equilibrium is the unique equilibrium and is globally stable; if R0>1, the chronic infection (positive) equilibrium exists and is globally stable under certain assumptions. Examples and numerical simulations for several special cases are presented, including various within-host dynamics models with discrete or distributed delays that have been well-studied in the literature. It is found that the global stability of the chronic infection equilibrium might change in some special cases when the assumptions do not hold. The results show that the model can be applied to describe the within-host dynamics of HBV, HIV, or HTLV-1 infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-191
Number of pages9
JournalMathematical Biosciences
Volume270
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Keywords

  • Distributed delay
  • Global stability
  • Hopf bifurcation
  • Lyapunov functional
  • Within-host dynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistics and Probability
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Applied Mathematics

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