Giving (Money) Back To Parents: Racial/Ethnic and Immigrant–Native Variation in Monetary Exchanges During the Transition to Adulthood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Scholars consistently find that parents provide economic support to their young adult children through the transition to adulthood. However, scholars rarely examine whether young adults contribute monetary resources to their parents. To test this proposition, I use the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, and the case of “money for living expenses.” Overall, monetary independence is the modal category for all groups. However, when I compare across groups, I find that White young adults with native-born parentage are more likely to report monetary independence, African Americans are more likely to report monetary interdependence and Asian and Latino children of immigrants are more likely to report child-to-parent assistance compared to each other, with SES explaining most, but not all, of these differences. I argue that young adult offspring in non-White families are more likely to provide monetary support to their parents during the transition to adulthood. These transfers may deplete resources for non-White young adults and may exacerbate racial/ethnic inequality during the transition to adulthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1157-1182
Number of pages26
JournalSociological Forum
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • financial independence
  • immigration
  • inequality
  • monetary transfers
  • race
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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