Geometric foraging strategies in multi-agent systems based on biological models

Musad Haque, Amir Rahmani, Magnus Egerstedt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In nature, communal hunting is often performed by predators by charging through an aggregation of prey. However, it has been noticed that variations exist in the geometric shape of the charging front; in addition, distinct differences arise between the shapes depending on the particulars of the feeding strategy. For example, each member of a dolphin foraging group must contribute to the hunt and will only be able to eat what it catches. On the other hand, some lions earn a "free lunch" by feigning help and later feasting on the prey caught by the more skilled hunters in the foraging group. We model the charging front of the predators as a curve moving through a prey density modeled as a reaction-diffusion process and we optimize the shape of the charging front in both the free lunch and no-free-lunch cases. These different situations are simulated under a number of varied types of predator-prey interaction models, and connections are made to multi-agent robot systems.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control
Pages6040-6045
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
Event2010 49th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, CDC 2010 - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: Dec 15 2010Dec 17 2010

Other

Other2010 49th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, CDC 2010
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period12/15/1012/17/10

Fingerprint

Biological Models
Foraging
Prey
Multi agent systems
Multi-agent Systems
Predator
Predator-prey
Agglomeration
Reaction-diffusion
Robots
Diffusion Process
Aggregation
Robot
Optimise
Distinct
Curve
Interaction
Model
Strategy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Control and Optimization

Cite this

Haque, M., Rahmani, A., & Egerstedt, M. (2010). Geometric foraging strategies in multi-agent systems based on biological models. In Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (pp. 6040-6045). [5717805] https://doi.org/10.1109/CDC.2010.5717805

Geometric foraging strategies in multi-agent systems based on biological models. / Haque, Musad; Rahmani, Amir; Egerstedt, Magnus.

Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control. 2010. p. 6040-6045 5717805.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Haque, M, Rahmani, A & Egerstedt, M 2010, Geometric foraging strategies in multi-agent systems based on biological models. in Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control., 5717805, pp. 6040-6045, 2010 49th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, CDC 2010, Atlanta, GA, United States, 12/15/10. https://doi.org/10.1109/CDC.2010.5717805
Haque M, Rahmani A, Egerstedt M. Geometric foraging strategies in multi-agent systems based on biological models. In Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control. 2010. p. 6040-6045. 5717805 https://doi.org/10.1109/CDC.2010.5717805
Haque, Musad ; Rahmani, Amir ; Egerstedt, Magnus. / Geometric foraging strategies in multi-agent systems based on biological models. Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control. 2010. pp. 6040-6045
@inproceedings{706c38416a4d4f398aeeed33b16dfbb1,
title = "Geometric foraging strategies in multi-agent systems based on biological models",
abstract = "In nature, communal hunting is often performed by predators by charging through an aggregation of prey. However, it has been noticed that variations exist in the geometric shape of the charging front; in addition, distinct differences arise between the shapes depending on the particulars of the feeding strategy. For example, each member of a dolphin foraging group must contribute to the hunt and will only be able to eat what it catches. On the other hand, some lions earn a {"}free lunch{"} by feigning help and later feasting on the prey caught by the more skilled hunters in the foraging group. We model the charging front of the predators as a curve moving through a prey density modeled as a reaction-diffusion process and we optimize the shape of the charging front in both the free lunch and no-free-lunch cases. These different situations are simulated under a number of varied types of predator-prey interaction models, and connections are made to multi-agent robot systems.",
author = "Musad Haque and Amir Rahmani and Magnus Egerstedt",
year = "2010",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1109/CDC.2010.5717805",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781424477456",
pages = "6040--6045",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Geometric foraging strategies in multi-agent systems based on biological models

AU - Haque, Musad

AU - Rahmani, Amir

AU - Egerstedt, Magnus

PY - 2010/12/1

Y1 - 2010/12/1

N2 - In nature, communal hunting is often performed by predators by charging through an aggregation of prey. However, it has been noticed that variations exist in the geometric shape of the charging front; in addition, distinct differences arise between the shapes depending on the particulars of the feeding strategy. For example, each member of a dolphin foraging group must contribute to the hunt and will only be able to eat what it catches. On the other hand, some lions earn a "free lunch" by feigning help and later feasting on the prey caught by the more skilled hunters in the foraging group. We model the charging front of the predators as a curve moving through a prey density modeled as a reaction-diffusion process and we optimize the shape of the charging front in both the free lunch and no-free-lunch cases. These different situations are simulated under a number of varied types of predator-prey interaction models, and connections are made to multi-agent robot systems.

AB - In nature, communal hunting is often performed by predators by charging through an aggregation of prey. However, it has been noticed that variations exist in the geometric shape of the charging front; in addition, distinct differences arise between the shapes depending on the particulars of the feeding strategy. For example, each member of a dolphin foraging group must contribute to the hunt and will only be able to eat what it catches. On the other hand, some lions earn a "free lunch" by feigning help and later feasting on the prey caught by the more skilled hunters in the foraging group. We model the charging front of the predators as a curve moving through a prey density modeled as a reaction-diffusion process and we optimize the shape of the charging front in both the free lunch and no-free-lunch cases. These different situations are simulated under a number of varied types of predator-prey interaction models, and connections are made to multi-agent robot systems.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79953141946&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79953141946&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/CDC.2010.5717805

DO - 10.1109/CDC.2010.5717805

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781424477456

SP - 6040

EP - 6045

BT - Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control

ER -