Geographic variation in mental health care disparities among racially/ethnically diverse adults with psychiatric disorders

Giyeon Kim, Natalie Dautovich, Katy Lauren Ford, Daniel Enrique Jimenez, Benjamin Cook, Richard M. Allman, Patricia Parmelee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The main purpose of this paper is to examine geographic variation in unmet need for mental health care among racially/ethnically diverse adults with psychiatric disorders in the US. Methods: Drawn from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES; 2001–2003), adults with any past year psychiatric disorder diagnosis (n = 3211) from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds were selected for analyses. Using weighted data, descriptive analyses and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results: Two-thirds of the total sample had unmet mental health care need, which differed significantly by race/ethnicity (p < .001). Logistic regression analyses show regional variation of the effect of race/ethnicity in unmet need: after adjusting for covariates, Latinos in the South, Blacks and Latinos in the Midwest, and Latinos and Asians in the West had higher unmet need than non-Hispanic Whites, whereas no significant racial/ethnic effects were found in the Northeast. Conclusions: Findings suggest that geographic region plays an important role in the sufficient use of mental health services among racial/ethnic minorities. Further research should elucidate reasons for geographic disparities in mental health care among racial/ethnic minority adults to reduce disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 6 2017

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Healthcare Disparities
Hispanic Americans
Psychiatry
Mental Health
mental health
health care
Delivery of Health Care
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
national minority
ethnicity
logistics
Mental Health Services
Mental Disorders
regression
Epidemiology
epidemiology
regional difference
health service
Research

Keywords

  • Disparities
  • Geography
  • Mental health care
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Unmet need

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Geographic variation in mental health care disparities among racially/ethnically diverse adults with psychiatric disorders. / Kim, Giyeon; Dautovich, Natalie; Ford, Katy Lauren; Jimenez, Daniel Enrique; Cook, Benjamin; Allman, Richard M.; Parmelee, Patricia.

In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 06.06.2017, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Giyeon ; Dautovich, Natalie ; Ford, Katy Lauren ; Jimenez, Daniel Enrique ; Cook, Benjamin ; Allman, Richard M. ; Parmelee, Patricia. / Geographic variation in mental health care disparities among racially/ethnically diverse adults with psychiatric disorders. In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology. 2017 ; pp. 1-10.
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