Geochemical consequences of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on coral reefs

Joan A. Kleypas, Robert W. Buddemeier, David Archer, Jean Pierre Gattuso, Chris Langdon, Bradley N. Opdyke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

843 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A coral reef represents the net accumulation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) produced by corals and other calcifying organisms. If calcification declines, then reef-building capacity also declines. Coral reef calcification depends on the saturation state of the carbonate mineral aragonite of surface waters. By the middle of the next century, an increased concentration of carbon dioxide will decrease the aragonite saturation state in the tropics by 30 percent and biogenic aragonite precipitation by 14 to 30 percent. Coral reefs are particularly threatened, because reef-building organisms secrete metastable forms of CaCO3, but the biogeochemical consequences on other calcifying marine ecosystems may be equally severe.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118-120
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume284
Issue number5411
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 1999
Externally publishedYes

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aragonite
coral reef
carbon dioxide
calcification
reef
saturation
capacity building
calcium carbonate
marine ecosystem
coral
surface water
carbonate
mineral
organism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Kleypas, J. A., Buddemeier, R. W., Archer, D., Gattuso, J. P., Langdon, C., & Opdyke, B. N. (1999). Geochemical consequences of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on coral reefs. Science, 284(5411), 118-120. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.284.5411.118

Geochemical consequences of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on coral reefs. / Kleypas, Joan A.; Buddemeier, Robert W.; Archer, David; Gattuso, Jean Pierre; Langdon, Chris; Opdyke, Bradley N.

In: Science, Vol. 284, No. 5411, 02.04.1999, p. 118-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kleypas, JA, Buddemeier, RW, Archer, D, Gattuso, JP, Langdon, C & Opdyke, BN 1999, 'Geochemical consequences of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on coral reefs', Science, vol. 284, no. 5411, pp. 118-120. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.284.5411.118
Kleypas JA, Buddemeier RW, Archer D, Gattuso JP, Langdon C, Opdyke BN. Geochemical consequences of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on coral reefs. Science. 1999 Apr 2;284(5411):118-120. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.284.5411.118
Kleypas, Joan A. ; Buddemeier, Robert W. ; Archer, David ; Gattuso, Jean Pierre ; Langdon, Chris ; Opdyke, Bradley N. / Geochemical consequences of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on coral reefs. In: Science. 1999 ; Vol. 284, No. 5411. pp. 118-120.
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