Genetics of autism: Complex aetiology for a heterogeneous disorder

Susan E. Folstein, Beth Rosen-Sheidley

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

614 Scopus citations

Abstract

Since autism was first recognized as a disorder in 1943, speculation about its aetiology has ranged from biological to psychological and back again. After twin studies during the 1970s and 1980s yielded unequivocal evidence for a genetic component, aetiological research in autism began to focus primarily on uncovering the genetic mechanisms involved. The identification of chromosomal abnormalities and Mendelian syndromes among individuals with autism, in conjunction with data from genome screens and candidate-gene studies, has helped to refine the view of the complex genetics that underlies autism spectrum conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)943-955
Number of pages13
JournalNature Reviews Genetics
Volume2
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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