Genetic mouse models for studying inhibitors of spinal axon regeneration

Binhai Zheng, Jae Lee, Fang Xie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The laboratory mouse has emerged as a primary model organism for studying axon regeneration after experimental spinal cord injury, owing to its genetic amenability. Mutant mouse models are contributing significantly to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of axon regeneration failure in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), in particular regarding the role of axon-growth inhibitors. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding axon regeneration failure that have been made using genetically modified mice, focusing on the inhibitory influences in the CNS, and we illustrate the advantages of using the mouse as a surrogate organism to study axon regeneration and spinal cord repair.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)640-646
Number of pages7
JournalTrends in Neurosciences
Volume29
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Genetic Models
Axons
Regeneration
Central Nervous System
Spinal Cord Regeneration
Growth Inhibitors
Spinal Cord Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Genetic mouse models for studying inhibitors of spinal axon regeneration. / Zheng, Binhai; Lee, Jae; Xie, Fang.

In: Trends in Neurosciences, Vol. 29, No. 11, 01.11.2006, p. 640-646.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zheng, Binhai ; Lee, Jae ; Xie, Fang. / Genetic mouse models for studying inhibitors of spinal axon regeneration. In: Trends in Neurosciences. 2006 ; Vol. 29, No. 11. pp. 640-646.
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