Genetic control of T helper cell function in the clawed toad Xenopus laevis

C. C A Bernard, G. Bordmann, Bonnie B Blomberg, L. Du Pasquier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The genetic control of the collaboration between Xenopus T and B cells had been analyzed in vitro using cells from five strains of major histocompatibility complex-defined Xenopus. When carrier (fowl gamma-globulin)-primed T cells and hapten (dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet hemocyanin)-primed B cells differed by minor histocompatibility antigens or by only one haplotype of the major histocompatibility complex, the collaboration was efficient in the sense that large numbers of plaques, low-molecular weight antibodies and high-affinity IgM antibodies could be recorded in the cultures challenged with dinitrophenylated fowl gamma-globulin. However, when T and B cells differed at both alleles of the major histocompatibility complex, lower numbers of plaques were obtained, no low-molecular weight anti-hapten antibodies could be detected, and the IgM antibodies that were sometimes synthesized were of low affinity. This suggests that the major histocompatibility complex, or a gene linked with it, affects the collaboration between Xenopus T and B cells in a way perhaps similar to that described in mammals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-155
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Xenopus laevis
Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Anura
B-Lymphocytes
Xenopus
T-Lymphocytes
Haptens
gamma-Globulins
Immunoglobulin M
Molecular Weight
Minor Histocompatibility Antigens
Antibody Affinity
Antibodies
Haplotypes
Mammals
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Alleles
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Genetic control of T helper cell function in the clawed toad Xenopus laevis. / Bernard, C. C A; Bordmann, G.; Blomberg, Bonnie B; Du Pasquier, L.

In: European Journal of Immunology, Vol. 11, No. 2, 01.01.1981, p. 151-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bernard, CCA, Bordmann, G, Blomberg, BB & Du Pasquier, L 1981, 'Genetic control of T helper cell function in the clawed toad Xenopus laevis', European Journal of Immunology, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 151-155.
Bernard, C. C A ; Bordmann, G. ; Blomberg, Bonnie B ; Du Pasquier, L. / Genetic control of T helper cell function in the clawed toad Xenopus laevis. In: European Journal of Immunology. 1981 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 151-155.
@article{ac74de82a6bc4b629b6b07101a57697d,
title = "Genetic control of T helper cell function in the clawed toad Xenopus laevis",
abstract = "The genetic control of the collaboration between Xenopus T and B cells had been analyzed in vitro using cells from five strains of major histocompatibility complex-defined Xenopus. When carrier (fowl gamma-globulin)-primed T cells and hapten (dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet hemocyanin)-primed B cells differed by minor histocompatibility antigens or by only one haplotype of the major histocompatibility complex, the collaboration was efficient in the sense that large numbers of plaques, low-molecular weight antibodies and high-affinity IgM antibodies could be recorded in the cultures challenged with dinitrophenylated fowl gamma-globulin. However, when T and B cells differed at both alleles of the major histocompatibility complex, lower numbers of plaques were obtained, no low-molecular weight anti-hapten antibodies could be detected, and the IgM antibodies that were sometimes synthesized were of low affinity. This suggests that the major histocompatibility complex, or a gene linked with it, affects the collaboration between Xenopus T and B cells in a way perhaps similar to that described in mammals.",
author = "Bernard, {C. C A} and G. Bordmann and Blomberg, {Bonnie B} and {Du Pasquier}, L.",
year = "1981",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "151--155",
journal = "European Journal of Immunology",
issn = "0014-2980",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic control of T helper cell function in the clawed toad Xenopus laevis

AU - Bernard, C. C A

AU - Bordmann, G.

AU - Blomberg, Bonnie B

AU - Du Pasquier, L.

PY - 1981/1/1

Y1 - 1981/1/1

N2 - The genetic control of the collaboration between Xenopus T and B cells had been analyzed in vitro using cells from five strains of major histocompatibility complex-defined Xenopus. When carrier (fowl gamma-globulin)-primed T cells and hapten (dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet hemocyanin)-primed B cells differed by minor histocompatibility antigens or by only one haplotype of the major histocompatibility complex, the collaboration was efficient in the sense that large numbers of plaques, low-molecular weight antibodies and high-affinity IgM antibodies could be recorded in the cultures challenged with dinitrophenylated fowl gamma-globulin. However, when T and B cells differed at both alleles of the major histocompatibility complex, lower numbers of plaques were obtained, no low-molecular weight anti-hapten antibodies could be detected, and the IgM antibodies that were sometimes synthesized were of low affinity. This suggests that the major histocompatibility complex, or a gene linked with it, affects the collaboration between Xenopus T and B cells in a way perhaps similar to that described in mammals.

AB - The genetic control of the collaboration between Xenopus T and B cells had been analyzed in vitro using cells from five strains of major histocompatibility complex-defined Xenopus. When carrier (fowl gamma-globulin)-primed T cells and hapten (dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet hemocyanin)-primed B cells differed by minor histocompatibility antigens or by only one haplotype of the major histocompatibility complex, the collaboration was efficient in the sense that large numbers of plaques, low-molecular weight antibodies and high-affinity IgM antibodies could be recorded in the cultures challenged with dinitrophenylated fowl gamma-globulin. However, when T and B cells differed at both alleles of the major histocompatibility complex, lower numbers of plaques were obtained, no low-molecular weight anti-hapten antibodies could be detected, and the IgM antibodies that were sometimes synthesized were of low affinity. This suggests that the major histocompatibility complex, or a gene linked with it, affects the collaboration between Xenopus T and B cells in a way perhaps similar to that described in mammals.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0019461724&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0019461724&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7011821

AN - SCOPUS:0019461724

VL - 11

SP - 151

EP - 155

JO - European Journal of Immunology

JF - European Journal of Immunology

SN - 0014-2980

IS - 2

ER -