Gender-related differences in infrarenal aortic aneurysm morphologic features: Issues relevant to Ancure and Talent endografts

Omaida C. Velazquez, Robert A. Larson, Richard A. Baum, Jeffery P. Carpenter, Michael A. Golden, Marc E. Mitchell, Ann Pyeron, Clyde F. Barker, Ronald M. Fairman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether gender-related anatomic variables may reduce applicability of aortic endografting in women. Methods: Data on all patients evaluated at our institution for endovascular repair of their abdominal aortic aneurysm were collected prospectively. Ancure (Endovascular Technologies (EVT)/Guidant Corporation, Menlo Park, Calif) and Talent (World Medical/Medtronic Corporation, Sunrise, Fla) endografts were used. Preoperative imaging included contrast-enhanced computed tomography and arteriography or magnetic resonance angiography. Results: One hundred forty-one patients were evaluated (April 1998-December 1999), 19 women (13.5%) and 122 men (86.5%). Unsuitable anatomy resulted in rejection of 63.2% of the women versus only 33.6% of the men (P = .026). Maximum aneurysm diameter in women and men were similar (women, 56.94 ± 8.23 mm; men, 39.29 ± 13.22 mm; P = .5). The incidence of iliac artery tortuosity was similar across gender (women, 36.8%; men, 54.9%; P = .2). The narrowest diameter of the larger external iliac artery in women was significantly smaller (7.29 ± 2.37 mm) than in men (8.62 ± 2.07 mm; P = .02). The proximal neck length was significantly shorter in women (10.79 ± 12.5 mm) than in men (20.47 ± 19.5 mm; P = .02). The proximal neck width was significantly wider in women (30.5 ± 2.4 mm) than in men (27.5 ± 2.5 mm; P= .013). Proximal neck angulation (>60 degrees) was seen in a significantly higher proportion of women (21%) than men (3.3%; P = .012). Of the patients accepted for endografting, a significantly higher proportion of women required an iliofemoral conduit for access (women, 28.6%; men, 1.2%; P = .016). Conclusion: Gender-related differences in infrarenal aortic aneurysm morphologic features may preclude widespread applicability of aortic endografting in women, as seen by our experience with the Ancure and Talent devices. In addition to a significantly reduced iliac artery size, women are more likely to have a shorter, more dilated, more angulated proximal aortic neck.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-84
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of vascular surgery
Volume33
Issue number2 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Velazquez, O. C., Larson, R. A., Baum, R. A., Carpenter, J. P., Golden, M. A., Mitchell, M. E., Pyeron, A., Barker, C. F., & Fairman, R. M. (2001). Gender-related differences in infrarenal aortic aneurysm morphologic features: Issues relevant to Ancure and Talent endografts. Journal of vascular surgery, 33(2 SUPPL.), 77-84. https://doi.org/10.1067/mva.2001.111921