Gender differences in self-report of recovery after stroke

The Northern Manhattan Study

J. Y. Chong, H. S. Lee, B. Boden-Albala, M. C. Paik, Ralph L Sacco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared subjective responses to simple questions after stroke with interviewer-assessed stroke outcome measures. Among those in the highest functional category, women were more likely to report incomplete recovery and greater need for help than men. Among these women, depressed mood was associated with a response of a need for help despite a good functional recovery. Self-reported responses in stroke outcome assessments require further validation by gender and may need to consider the confounding effects of depression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1282-1284
Number of pages3
JournalNeurology
Volume67
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Self Report
Stroke
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Interviews
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Gender differences in self-report of recovery after stroke : The Northern Manhattan Study. / Chong, J. Y.; Lee, H. S.; Boden-Albala, B.; Paik, M. C.; Sacco, Ralph L.

In: Neurology, Vol. 67, No. 7, 01.10.2006, p. 1282-1284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chong, J. Y. ; Lee, H. S. ; Boden-Albala, B. ; Paik, M. C. ; Sacco, Ralph L. / Gender differences in self-report of recovery after stroke : The Northern Manhattan Study. In: Neurology. 2006 ; Vol. 67, No. 7. pp. 1282-1284.
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