Gender differences in psychological distress among immigrants from the former Soviet Union

Karen J. Aroian, Anne E Norris, Lenny Chiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study we compared rates and correlates of psychological distress among immigrant women and men from the former Soviet Union. A demographic, migration, and social network questionnaire and the Symptom Checklist-90-R were administered to 935 female and 706 male immigrants. Older age and less time in the United States predicted distress in both gender groups. However, having less education, leaving relatives behind, and not being sponsored by friends or a religious organization predicted greater distress for women. Women reported significantly more distress than men except for those men who were married and retired.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-51
Number of pages13
JournalSex Roles
Volume48
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

USSR
gender-specific factors
immigrant
Psychology
Checklist
Social Support
social network
Demography
Organizations
migration
Education
organization
questionnaire
gender
education
Group

Keywords

  • Immigrants; gender
  • Psychological distress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Gender Studies

Cite this

Gender differences in psychological distress among immigrants from the former Soviet Union. / Aroian, Karen J.; Norris, Anne E; Chiang, Lenny.

In: Sex Roles, Vol. 48, No. 1-2, 01.2003, p. 39-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aroian, Karen J. ; Norris, Anne E ; Chiang, Lenny. / Gender differences in psychological distress among immigrants from the former Soviet Union. In: Sex Roles. 2003 ; Vol. 48, No. 1-2. pp. 39-51.
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