Gender bias and individualism: responses to case vignettes among psychologists, professors, and students

Michael G. Tredinnick, Blaine J. Fowers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the extent to which psychologists, when compared to university professors and evening school students, employ individualist values differentially in their responses to vignettes describing males and females. The participants responded to 6 vignettes by choosing initial hypotheses that reflected either utilitarian (traditionally masculine) or expressive (traditionally feminine) themes. Two vignettes involved a sex of client manipulation, but neither resulted in a sex of client effect. An analysis of the responses to the remaining 4 vignettes indicated a marked preference for the masculine form of individualism for males, but were evenly divided for females in all three groups. These results suggest that psychologists were just as likely to engage in bias as others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-299
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Psychology
Volume15
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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