Games parents play with normal and high-risk infants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Game playing during early infant-parent interactions provides a context for learning conversational turntaking and contingent responsivity. The types and frequency of "universally" recognized infant games were observed during face-to-face interactions of normal and high risk infant-parent dyads when the infants were four months old. Approximately six different games were played for approximately one-third of the interaction time. Except during interactions with normal male infants mothers and fathers played games equally as often. The high-risk infant-parent dyads engaged in game playing less frequently than the normal infant-parent dyads. These differences are discussed in the context of the high-risk infants being "difficult" babies and relatively less responsive.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-48
Number of pages8
JournalChild Psychiatry & Human Development
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1979

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Games parents play with normal and high-risk infants. / Field, Tiffany M.

In: Child Psychiatry & Human Development, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.09.1979, p. 41-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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