Further evidence on the labor market effects of addiction: Chronic drug use and employment in metropolitan miami

Pierre Kébreau Alexandre, Michael French

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study used data collected from 1996 to 1997 in low-income and high-crime neighborhoods in Miami, Florida, to analyze the effects of chronic drug use on employment. Given the significant gender differences in substance use patterns and labor market behavior, separate models were estimated for males and females. The analysis estimated univariate probit models of employment and bivariate probit models that allow for possible correlation among missing or unobserved determinants of drug use and employment. The key finding was that regardless of gender and specification, chronic drug use significantly reduced the probability of being employed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)382-393
Number of pages12
JournalContemporary Economic Policy
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004

Fingerprint

addiction
drug use
labor market
evidence
behavior model
gender-specific factors
low income
offense
determinants
gender
Addiction
Labour market
Drug use
Substance use
Crime
Low income
Market behavior
Bivariate probit model
Gender differences
Probit model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Public Administration
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Further evidence on the labor market effects of addiction : Chronic drug use and employment in metropolitan miami. / Alexandre, Pierre Kébreau; French, Michael.

In: Contemporary Economic Policy, Vol. 22, No. 3, 07.2004, p. 382-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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