Functional genomics: New insights into the 'function' of low levels of gene expression in stem cells

Jennifer A. Hipp, Jason D. Hipp, Anthony Atala, Shay Soker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the global gene expression profile of stem cells and their multilineage differentiation will be essential for their ultimate therapeutic application. Efforts to characterize stem cells have relied on analyzing the genomewide expression profiles that are biased towards the identification of genes that display the most pronounced differential expression. Rather than being viewed as a "blank" state, recent studies suggest that stem cells express low levels of multiple lineage specific genes prior to differentiation, a phenomenon known as "lineage priming." It is not likely that low levels of lineage-specific genes produce sufficient amounts of differentiation factors, but rather to provide rapid transcription to a wide range of lineage programs prior to differentiation. Thus, stem cell differentiation may involve the elimination of other potential pathways and the activation of a specific lineage program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)354-358
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Genomics
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 17 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Genomics
Stem Cells
Gene Expression
Genes
Transcriptome
Cell Differentiation
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Differentiation
  • Microarrays
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Functional genomics : New insights into the 'function' of low levels of gene expression in stem cells. / Hipp, Jennifer A.; Hipp, Jason D.; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay.

In: Current Genomics, Vol. 11, No. 5, 17.09.2010, p. 354-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hipp, Jennifer A. ; Hipp, Jason D. ; Atala, Anthony ; Soker, Shay. / Functional genomics : New insights into the 'function' of low levels of gene expression in stem cells. In: Current Genomics. 2010 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 354-358.
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