From transplanting Schwann cells in experimental rat spinal cord injury to their transplantation into human injured spinal cord in clinical trials

Mary B Bunge, Paula V Monje, A. Khan, Patrick Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Among the potential therapies designed to repair the injured spinal cord is cell transplantation, notably the use of autologous adult human Schwann cells (SCs). Here, we detail some of the critical research accomplished over the last four decades to establish a foundation that enables these cells to be tested in clinical trials. New culture systems allowed novel information to be gained about SCs, including discovering ways to stimulate their proliferation to acquire adequately large numbers for transplantation into the injured human spinal cord. Transplantation of rat SCs into rat models of spinal cord injury has demonstrated that SCs promote repair of injured spinal cord. Additional work required to gain approval from the Food and Drug Administration for the first SC trial in the Miami Project is disclosed. This trial and a second one now underway are described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalProgress in Brain Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Schwann Cells
Spinal Cord Injuries
Spinal Cord
Transplantation
Clinical Trials
Spinal Cord Regeneration
Cell Transplantation
United States Food and Drug Administration
Research

Keywords

  • Human Schwann cells
  • Schwann cell clinical trials
  • Schwann cell transplantation
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Spinal cord repair

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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