From alienation to collaboration

Three techniques for building alliances with adolescents in family therapy

Gary M. Diamond, Howard A Liddle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Adolescents are not inclined to participate in most stapdard psychotherapies. Engaging teenagers in treatment is one of the greatest challenges for clinicians working with adolescents (Kazdin, 1990; Armbruster and Kazdin, 1994; Liddle, 1991; Szapocznik et al., 1988). Kazdin (1990) cites reports that between 50 and 75 percent of children referred for treatment either do not initiate treatment or terminate prematurely. Sporadic attendance and premature dropout have been identified as major obstacles to the successful treatment of children with conduct disorders (Liddle and Dakof, 1995a, 1995b; Prinz and Miller, 1994). If clinicians hope to effectively serve troubled teenagers and their families, they must find a way to increase adolescents’ participation in the treatment process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication101 More Interventions in Family Therapy
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages87-95
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9781317791454
ISBN (Print)0789005700, 9780789000583
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Family Therapy
Hope
Therapeutics
Conduct Disorder
Psychotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

From alienation to collaboration : Three techniques for building alliances with adolescents in family therapy. / Diamond, Gary M.; Liddle, Howard A.

101 More Interventions in Family Therapy. Taylor and Francis, 2014. p. 87-95.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Diamond, Gary M. ; Liddle, Howard A. / From alienation to collaboration : Three techniques for building alliances with adolescents in family therapy. 101 More Interventions in Family Therapy. Taylor and Francis, 2014. pp. 87-95
@inbook{65f2b24a69df44039095f927a10a4a03,
title = "From alienation to collaboration: Three techniques for building alliances with adolescents in family therapy",
abstract = "Adolescents are not inclined to participate in most stapdard psychotherapies. Engaging teenagers in treatment is one of the greatest challenges for clinicians working with adolescents (Kazdin, 1990; Armbruster and Kazdin, 1994; Liddle, 1991; Szapocznik et al., 1988). Kazdin (1990) cites reports that between 50 and 75 percent of children referred for treatment either do not initiate treatment or terminate prematurely. Sporadic attendance and premature dropout have been identified as major obstacles to the successful treatment of children with conduct disorders (Liddle and Dakof, 1995a, 1995b; Prinz and Miller, 1994). If clinicians hope to effectively serve troubled teenagers and their families, they must find a way to increase adolescents’ participation in the treatment process.",
author = "Diamond, {Gary M.} and Liddle, {Howard A}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4324/9781315810072-29",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "0789005700",
pages = "87--95",
booktitle = "101 More Interventions in Family Therapy",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - From alienation to collaboration

T2 - Three techniques for building alliances with adolescents in family therapy

AU - Diamond, Gary M.

AU - Liddle, Howard A

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Adolescents are not inclined to participate in most stapdard psychotherapies. Engaging teenagers in treatment is one of the greatest challenges for clinicians working with adolescents (Kazdin, 1990; Armbruster and Kazdin, 1994; Liddle, 1991; Szapocznik et al., 1988). Kazdin (1990) cites reports that between 50 and 75 percent of children referred for treatment either do not initiate treatment or terminate prematurely. Sporadic attendance and premature dropout have been identified as major obstacles to the successful treatment of children with conduct disorders (Liddle and Dakof, 1995a, 1995b; Prinz and Miller, 1994). If clinicians hope to effectively serve troubled teenagers and their families, they must find a way to increase adolescents’ participation in the treatment process.

AB - Adolescents are not inclined to participate in most stapdard psychotherapies. Engaging teenagers in treatment is one of the greatest challenges for clinicians working with adolescents (Kazdin, 1990; Armbruster and Kazdin, 1994; Liddle, 1991; Szapocznik et al., 1988). Kazdin (1990) cites reports that between 50 and 75 percent of children referred for treatment either do not initiate treatment or terminate prematurely. Sporadic attendance and premature dropout have been identified as major obstacles to the successful treatment of children with conduct disorders (Liddle and Dakof, 1995a, 1995b; Prinz and Miller, 1994). If clinicians hope to effectively serve troubled teenagers and their families, they must find a way to increase adolescents’ participation in the treatment process.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071001842&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85071001842&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4324/9781315810072-29

DO - 10.4324/9781315810072-29

M3 - Chapter

SN - 0789005700

SN - 9780789000583

SP - 87

EP - 95

BT - 101 More Interventions in Family Therapy

PB - Taylor and Francis

ER -