Frequency of drinking games participation and alcohol-related problems in a multiethnic sample of college students: Do gender and ethnicity matter?

Byron L. Zamboanga, Ivan Jacob Agaloos Pesigan, Cara C. Tomaso, Seth J Schwartz, Lindsay S. Ham, Melina Bersamin, Su Yeong Kim, Miguel A. Cano, Linda G. Castillo, Larry F. Forthun, Susan Krauss Whitbourne, Eric A. Hurley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: A drinking game (DG) is a high-risk, social drinking activity that consists of certain rules (i.e., when to drink and how much to consume) designed to promote inebriation and that requires each player to perform a cognitive and/or motor task (Zamboanga et al., 2013). Research suggests that non-White or female students who play DGs are at an increased risk of experiencing alcohol-related problems. Thus, this study examined whether the associations between DG participation and alcohol-related problems were similar for men and women and across ethnic groups. Method: College students (N. =. 7409; 73% women; 64% White, 8% Black, 14% Hispanic, 14% Asian) from 30 U.S. colleges/universities completed self-report questionnaires. Results: Controlling for age, site, Greek membership (i.e., membership in a fraternity or sorority), and typical alcohol consumption, results indicated that the association between DG participation and alcohol-related problems was stronger for men compared to women. With respect to ethnicity, the association between these variables was stronger among Black women than Black men. Conclusions: Findings from this large-scale study highlight the need to closely investigate how gender and ethnicity moderate the associations between DG participation and alcohol-related problems. College intervention efforts designed to address high-risk drinking behaviors such as DG participation might consider paying close attention to ethnic minority populations, perhaps particularly Black women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-116
Number of pages5
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume41
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

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Drinking
Alcohols
Students
Drinking Behavior
Risk-Taking
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
Alcohol Drinking
Self Report
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Alcohol use
  • College students
  • Drinking games
  • Ethnicity
  • Gender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Frequency of drinking games participation and alcohol-related problems in a multiethnic sample of college students : Do gender and ethnicity matter? / Zamboanga, Byron L.; Pesigan, Ivan Jacob Agaloos; Tomaso, Cara C.; Schwartz, Seth J; Ham, Lindsay S.; Bersamin, Melina; Kim, Su Yeong; Cano, Miguel A.; Castillo, Linda G.; Forthun, Larry F.; Whitbourne, Susan Krauss; Hurley, Eric A.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 41, 01.02.2015, p. 112-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zamboanga, BL, Pesigan, IJA, Tomaso, CC, Schwartz, SJ, Ham, LS, Bersamin, M, Kim, SY, Cano, MA, Castillo, LG, Forthun, LF, Whitbourne, SK & Hurley, EA 2015, 'Frequency of drinking games participation and alcohol-related problems in a multiethnic sample of college students: Do gender and ethnicity matter?', Addictive Behaviors, vol. 41, pp. 112-116. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.10.002
Zamboanga, Byron L. ; Pesigan, Ivan Jacob Agaloos ; Tomaso, Cara C. ; Schwartz, Seth J ; Ham, Lindsay S. ; Bersamin, Melina ; Kim, Su Yeong ; Cano, Miguel A. ; Castillo, Linda G. ; Forthun, Larry F. ; Whitbourne, Susan Krauss ; Hurley, Eric A. / Frequency of drinking games participation and alcohol-related problems in a multiethnic sample of college students : Do gender and ethnicity matter?. In: Addictive Behaviors. 2015 ; Vol. 41. pp. 112-116.
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