Fractional photothermolysis

Dieter Manstein, Hans Joachim Laubac, Sofia Iglesia, Alaleh Dormishian, Ali Rajabi-Estarabadi, Keyvan Nouri

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Traditional Resurfacing techniques are well established treatments for modifying appearances and characteristics of the skin, but their drawbacks include prolonged procedural downtime, scarring risk and long-lasting hyperpigmentation. Fractional Photothermolysis (FP) overcomes these drawbacks through the generation of patterns of microscopic treatment zones (MTZs), while leaving the surrounding skin undamaged, allowing for quick healing and limits the development of inflammation and fibrosis. The ability of delivering multiple FP treatments and with the manipulation of the laser parameters allows the physician to choose between the two types of FP and customize the treatment regime that is best fit for the patients' needs and expectations. Non-Ablative gener Traditional Resurfacing techniques are well established treatments for modifying appearances and characteristics of the skin, but their drawbacks include prolonged procedural downtime, scarring risk and long-lasting hyperpigmentation. Fractional Photothermolysis (FP) overcomes these drawbacks through the generation of patterns of microscopic treatment zones (MTZs), while leaving the surrounding skin undamaged, allowing for quick healing and limits the development of inflammation and fibrosis. The ability of delivering multiple FP treatments and with the manipulation of the laser parameters allows the physician to choose between the two types of FP and customize the treatment regime that is best fit for the patients' needs and expectations. Non-Ablative generates MTZs by thermal coagulation while Ablative FP generates MTZs by vaporizing microscopic zones of tissue which results in immediate tissue loss and a surrounding zone of coagulated tissue. FP techniques include a wide spectrum of dermatological diseases that could be treated through the facilitation of drug and cell delivery into the skin. FP demonstrates to be an effective home-use product for selftreating wrinkles, 87% of patients have reported improvement in the appearance of wrinkles in a 1-3 months period. The future for FP may include specialties beyond dermatology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLasers in dermatology and medicine
Subtitle of host publicationdermatologic applications
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages165-196
Number of pages32
ISBN (Electronic)9783319761183
ISBN (Print)9783319761169
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 6 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Ablative fractional photothermolysis
  • Dermatological laser therapy
  • Fractional photothermolysis
  • Fractional resurfacing
  • Microdermal treatment zones
  • Microscopic treatment zones
  • Non-Ablative fractional photothermolysis
  • Optical penetration depth
  • Thermal coagulation
  • Vaporizing microscopic zones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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  • Cite this

    Manstein, D., Laubac, H. J., Iglesia, S., Dormishian, A., Rajabi-Estarabadi, A., & Nouri, K. (2018). Fractional photothermolysis. In Lasers in dermatology and medicine: dermatologic applications (pp. 165-196). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-76118-3_10