Formulated collagen gel accelerates healing rate immediately after application in patients with diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers

Peter Blume, Vickie R. Driver, Arthur J. Tallis, Robert Kirsner, Roy Kroeker, Wyatt G. Payne, Soma Wali, William Marston, Cyaandi Dove, Robert L. Engler, Lois A. Chandler, Barbara K. Sosnowski

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32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We assessed the safety and efficacy of Formulated Collagen Gel (FCG) alone and with Ad5PDGF-B (GAM501) compared with Standard of Care (SOC) in patients with 1.5-10.0cm2 chronic diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers that healed < 30% during Run-in. Wound size was assessed by planimetry of acetate tracings and photographs in 124 patients. Comparison of data sets revealed that acetate tracings frequently overestimated areas at some sites. For per-protocol analysis, 113 patients qualified using acetate tracings but only 82 qualified using photographs. Prior animal studies suggested that collagen alone would have little effect on healing and would serve as a negative control. Surprisingly trends for increased incidence of complete closure were observed for both GAM501 (41%) and FCG (45%) vs. Standard of Care (31%). By photographic data, Standard of Care had no significant effect on change in wound radius (mm/week) from during Run-in to Week 1 (-0.06 ± 0.32 to 0.78 ± 1.53, p=ns) but both FCG (-0.08 ± 0.61 to 1.97 ± 1.77, p < 0.002) and GAM501 (-0.02 ± 0.58 to 1.46 ± 1.37, p < 0.002) significantly increased healing rates that gradually declined over subsequent weeks. Both GAM501 and FCGappeared to be safe and well tolerated, and alternate dosing schedules hold promise to improve overall complete wound closure in adequately powered trials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)302-308
Number of pages7
JournalWound Repair and Regeneration
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

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Diabetic Foot
Collagen
Standard of Care
Gels
Acetates
Wounds and Injuries
Appointments and Schedules
Safety
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Formulated collagen gel accelerates healing rate immediately after application in patients with diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers. / Blume, Peter; Driver, Vickie R.; Tallis, Arthur J.; Kirsner, Robert; Kroeker, Roy; Payne, Wyatt G.; Wali, Soma; Marston, William; Dove, Cyaandi; Engler, Robert L.; Chandler, Lois A.; Sosnowski, Barbara K.

In: Wound Repair and Regeneration, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.05.2011, p. 302-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blume, P, Driver, VR, Tallis, AJ, Kirsner, R, Kroeker, R, Payne, WG, Wali, S, Marston, W, Dove, C, Engler, RL, Chandler, LA & Sosnowski, BK 2011, 'Formulated collagen gel accelerates healing rate immediately after application in patients with diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers', Wound Repair and Regeneration, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 302-308. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1524-475X.2011.00669.x
Blume, Peter ; Driver, Vickie R. ; Tallis, Arthur J. ; Kirsner, Robert ; Kroeker, Roy ; Payne, Wyatt G. ; Wali, Soma ; Marston, William ; Dove, Cyaandi ; Engler, Robert L. ; Chandler, Lois A. ; Sosnowski, Barbara K. / Formulated collagen gel accelerates healing rate immediately after application in patients with diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers. In: Wound Repair and Regeneration. 2011 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 302-308.
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