Forgiveness and Justice: A Research Agenda for Social and Personality Psychology

Julie Juola Exline, Everett L. Worthington, Peter Hill, Michael McCullough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

235 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forgiveness and related constructs (e.g., repentance, mercy, reconciliation) are ripe for study by social and personality psychologists, including those interested in justice. Current trends in social science, law, management, philosophy, and theology suggest a need to expand existing justice frameworks to incorporate alternatives or complements to retribution, including forgiveness and related processes. In this article, we raise five challenging empirical questions about forgiveness. For each question, we briefly review representative research, raise hypotheses, and suggest specific ways in which social and personality psychologists could make distinctive contributions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-348
Number of pages12
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Review
Volume7
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 10 2003

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Forgiveness
Social Psychology
Social Justice
Personality
Research
Theology
Psychology
Social Sciences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Forgiveness and Justice : A Research Agenda for Social and Personality Psychology. / Exline, Julie Juola; Worthington, Everett L.; Hill, Peter; McCullough, Michael.

In: Personality and Social Psychology Review, Vol. 7, No. 4, 10.12.2003, p. 337-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Exline, Julie Juola ; Worthington, Everett L. ; Hill, Peter ; McCullough, Michael. / Forgiveness and Justice : A Research Agenda for Social and Personality Psychology. In: Personality and Social Psychology Review. 2003 ; Vol. 7, No. 4. pp. 337-348.
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