Food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami

Nicholas S. Vogenthaler, Craig Hadley, Sarah J. Lewis, Allan E Rodriguez, Lisa R. Metsch, Carlos Del Rio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To measure the occurrence and correlates of food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami, USA. Design: Non-probability cross-sectional sample.Setting Inner-city hospitals in Atlanta and Miami.Subjects Two hundred and eighty-seven HIV-infected crack users. Results: One-third (34 %) of respondents experienced food insufficiency within 30 d of interview. Increased odds of food insufficiency was associated with current homelessness (adjusted OR = 3.78, 95 % CI 1.70, 8.41), living alone (adjusted OR = 2.85, 95 % CI 1.36, 5.98), religious service attendance (adjusted OR = 2.34, 95 % CI 1.02, 5.38) and presence of health insurance (adjusted OR = 2.41, 95 % CI 1.06, 5.54). Monthly income greater than $US 600 (adjusted OR = 0.19, 95 % CI 0.06, 0.58) was associated with decreased odds of food insufficiency, and less than weekly crack use was marginally associated with decreased odds of food insufficiency (adjusted OR = 0.39, 95 % CI 0.13, 1.08). Conclusions: Food insufficiency is very prevalent among HIV-infected urban crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami. Correlates of food insufficiency confirm the social vulnerability of these individuals. Routine assessment for food insecurity should become a routine component of treatment and prevention programmes in at-risk populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1478-1484
Number of pages7
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 18 2010

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Crack Cocaine
HIV
Food
Homeless Persons
Food Supply
Urban Hospitals
Health Insurance
Interviews

Keywords

  • Drug use
  • Food insufficiency
  • HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami. / Vogenthaler, Nicholas S.; Hadley, Craig; Lewis, Sarah J.; Rodriguez, Allan E; Metsch, Lisa R.; Del Rio, Carlos.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 13, No. 9, 18.01.2010, p. 1478-1484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vogenthaler, NS, Hadley, C, Lewis, SJ, Rodriguez, AE, Metsch, LR & Del Rio, C 2010, 'Food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami', Public Health Nutrition, vol. 13, no. 9, pp. 1478-1484. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980009993181
Vogenthaler, Nicholas S. ; Hadley, Craig ; Lewis, Sarah J. ; Rodriguez, Allan E ; Metsch, Lisa R. ; Del Rio, Carlos. / Food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 13, No. 9. pp. 1478-1484.
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