Focus groups as an intervention for low-income African American smokers to promote participation in subsequent intervention studies

Monica W Hooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

African Americans are often underrepresented in smoking cessation research. Focus groups were examined as an intervention to increase readiness to quit smoking, the processes of change, and the odds of randomized clinical trial (RCT) participation of non-treatment-seeking, low-income African American smokers. Ten focus groups were conducted. Smokers completed baseline and/or post-group assessments of readiness to quit, the processes of change, and focus group quality. Significant increases were discerned in readiness to quit smoking and the processes of change. Seventy-six percent of participants enrolled in a self-help RCT, which was associated with readiness to quit smoking and plans to set a quit date. One-session focus groups among low-income African American smokers appear to facilitate cognitive changes and participation in RCTs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-151
Number of pages11
JournalResearch in Nursing and Health
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Focus Groups
African Americans
Smoking
Smoking Cessation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Focus groups
  • Processes of change
  • Readiness to quit
  • Recruitment
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Focus groups as an intervention for low-income African American smokers to promote participation in subsequent intervention studies. / Hooper, Monica W.

In: Research in Nursing and Health, Vol. 31, No. 2, 01.04.2008, p. 141-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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