Focal brain injury: histological evidence of delayed inflammatory response in a new rodent model of focal cortical injury.

P. Mathew, D. I. Graham, Ross Bullock, W. Maxwell, J. McCulloch, G. Teasdale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cortical contusions are one of the most common characteristics in head injury and are regarded by many as the hallmark of significant injury. No experimental study has clarified the roles of mechanical forces, haemorrhage and ischaemia in the process of progressive acute brain damage and later neurobehavioural dysfunction. We have devised a new, simple reproducible rodent model of focal cortical injury which employs a 'pure' mechanical/physical force applied through the intact dura. Using this model we have investigated the time course and pattern of changes in neurons, glia and microvasculature. With the exception of haemorrhage, this model closely reproduces the light- and electron microscopy features of human contusion. In the absence of perivascular haemorrhage we have demonstrated delayed perivascular protein leakage and polymorphonuclear-leukocyte infiltration of the damaged cortex. We postulate that a component of the delayed blood brain barrier breakdown demonstrated in human focal head injury (which may contribute to swelling and brain damage) is due to an acute inflammatory response, the magnitude of which is dependent on the amount of tissue injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)428-430
Number of pages3
JournalActa Neurochirurgica, Supplement
Volume60
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

brain damage
rodents
Brain Injuries
Rodentia
Brain
hemorrhages
Hemorrhage
Craniocerebral Trauma
Wounds and Injuries
Contusions
Brain Edema
Microvessels
Blood-Brain Barrier
Infiltration
Neuroglia
Electron microscopy
Neurons
Optical microscopy
Swelling
Electron Microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Mathew, P., Graham, D. I., Bullock, R., Maxwell, W., McCulloch, J., & Teasdale, G. (1994). Focal brain injury: histological evidence of delayed inflammatory response in a new rodent model of focal cortical injury. Acta Neurochirurgica, Supplement, 60, 428-430.

Focal brain injury : histological evidence of delayed inflammatory response in a new rodent model of focal cortical injury. / Mathew, P.; Graham, D. I.; Bullock, Ross; Maxwell, W.; McCulloch, J.; Teasdale, G.

In: Acta Neurochirurgica, Supplement, Vol. 60, 01.01.1994, p. 428-430.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mathew, P, Graham, DI, Bullock, R, Maxwell, W, McCulloch, J & Teasdale, G 1994, 'Focal brain injury: histological evidence of delayed inflammatory response in a new rodent model of focal cortical injury.', Acta Neurochirurgica, Supplement, vol. 60, pp. 428-430.
Mathew, P. ; Graham, D. I. ; Bullock, Ross ; Maxwell, W. ; McCulloch, J. ; Teasdale, G. / Focal brain injury : histological evidence of delayed inflammatory response in a new rodent model of focal cortical injury. In: Acta Neurochirurgica, Supplement. 1994 ; Vol. 60. pp. 428-430.
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