Fish red blood cell carbon dioxide transport in vitro: A comparative study

S. F. Perry, C. M. Wood, P. J. Walsh, S. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Red blood cell (rbc) carbon dioxide transport was examined in vitro in three teleosts (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Anguilla anguilla, Scophthalmus maximus) and an elasmobranch (Scyliorhinus canicula) using a radio-isotopic assay that measures the net conversion of plasma HCO3- to CO2. The experiments were designed to compare the intrinsic rates of rbc CO2 excretion and the impact of haemoglobin oxygenation/deoxygenation among the species. Under conditions simulating in vivo levels of plasma HCO3- and natural haematocrits, the rate of whole blood CO2 excretion varied between 14.0 μmol ml-1 h-1 (S. canicula) and 17.6 μmol ml-1 h-1 (O. mykiss). The rate of CO2 excretion in separated plasma was significantly greater in the dogfish, S. canicula. The contribution of the rbc to overall whole blood CO2 excretion was low in the dogfish (46 ± 6%) compared to the teleosts (trout, 71 ± 4%; turbot, 64 ± 5%; eel, 55 ± 3%). To eliminate the naturally occurring differences in haematocrit and plasma [HCO3-] as inter-specific variables, the rates of whole blood CO2 excretion were determined in blood that had been resuspended to constant [HCO3-] (5 mmol-1) and haematocrit (20%) in appropriate teleost and elasmobranch Ringer solutions. Under such normalized conditions, the rate of whole blood CO2 excretion was significantly higher in the turbot (22.4 ± 1.3 μmol ml-1 h-1) in comparison to the other species (16.4-18.4 μmol ml-1 h-1) and thus revealed a greater intrinsic rate of rbc CO2 excretion in the turbot. To study the contribution of Bohr protons, the rates of whole blood CO2 excretion were assessed in blood subjected to rapid oxygenation during the initial phase of the 3 min assay period. Rapid oxygenation significantly enhanced the rate of CO2 excretion in the teleosts but not in the elasmobranch. The extent of the increase provided by the rapid oxygenation of haemoglobin was a linear function of the extent of the Haldane effect, as quantified in each species from in vitro CO2 dissociation (combining) curves. Under steady-state conditions, deoxygenated blood exhibited greater rates of CO2 excretion than oxygenated blood in the teleosts but not in the elasmobranch. As a consequence of the Haldane effect, rbc intracellular pH was increased in the teleosts by deoxygenation but was unaltered in the elasmobranch. The results, by extrapolation, suggest that the rates of CO2 excretion in vivo are influenced by the magnitude of the Haldane effect and the extent of haemoglobin oxygenation during gill transit in addition to the intrinsic rate at which the rbc converts plasma HCO3- to CO2.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-130
Number of pages10
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Physiology
Volume113
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996

Fingerprint

Carbon Dioxide
Fishes
Elasmobranchii
Erythrocytes
Flatfishes
Hematocrit
Dogfish
Anguilla
Hemoglobins
Oncorhynchus mykiss
In Vitro Techniques
Eels
Trout
Radio
Protons

Keywords

  • Anguilla anguilla
  • Band-3
  • Carbon dioxide excretion
  • Haemoglobin
  • Haldane effect
  • Oncorhynchus mykiss
  • Red blood cell
  • Scophthalmus maximus
  • Scyliorhinus canicula

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Fish red blood cell carbon dioxide transport in vitro : A comparative study. / Perry, S. F.; Wood, C. M.; Walsh, P. J.; Thomas, S.

In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Physiology, Vol. 113, No. 2, 01.12.1996, p. 121-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perry, S. F. ; Wood, C. M. ; Walsh, P. J. ; Thomas, S. / Fish red blood cell carbon dioxide transport in vitro : A comparative study. In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Physiology. 1996 ; Vol. 113, No. 2. pp. 121-130.
@article{3601c5a440b448c29bb347fdf199effc,
title = "Fish red blood cell carbon dioxide transport in vitro: A comparative study",
abstract = "Red blood cell (rbc) carbon dioxide transport was examined in vitro in three teleosts (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Anguilla anguilla, Scophthalmus maximus) and an elasmobranch (Scyliorhinus canicula) using a radio-isotopic assay that measures the net conversion of plasma HCO3- to CO2. The experiments were designed to compare the intrinsic rates of rbc CO2 excretion and the impact of haemoglobin oxygenation/deoxygenation among the species. Under conditions simulating in vivo levels of plasma HCO3- and natural haematocrits, the rate of whole blood CO2 excretion varied between 14.0 μmol ml-1 h-1 (S. canicula) and 17.6 μmol ml-1 h-1 (O. mykiss). The rate of CO2 excretion in separated plasma was significantly greater in the dogfish, S. canicula. The contribution of the rbc to overall whole blood CO2 excretion was low in the dogfish (46 ± 6{\%}) compared to the teleosts (trout, 71 ± 4{\%}; turbot, 64 ± 5{\%}; eel, 55 ± 3{\%}). To eliminate the naturally occurring differences in haematocrit and plasma [HCO3-] as inter-specific variables, the rates of whole blood CO2 excretion were determined in blood that had been resuspended to constant [HCO3-] (5 mmol-1) and haematocrit (20{\%}) in appropriate teleost and elasmobranch Ringer solutions. Under such normalized conditions, the rate of whole blood CO2 excretion was significantly higher in the turbot (22.4 ± 1.3 μmol ml-1 h-1) in comparison to the other species (16.4-18.4 μmol ml-1 h-1) and thus revealed a greater intrinsic rate of rbc CO2 excretion in the turbot. To study the contribution of Bohr protons, the rates of whole blood CO2 excretion were assessed in blood subjected to rapid oxygenation during the initial phase of the 3 min assay period. Rapid oxygenation significantly enhanced the rate of CO2 excretion in the teleosts but not in the elasmobranch. The extent of the increase provided by the rapid oxygenation of haemoglobin was a linear function of the extent of the Haldane effect, as quantified in each species from in vitro CO2 dissociation (combining) curves. Under steady-state conditions, deoxygenated blood exhibited greater rates of CO2 excretion than oxygenated blood in the teleosts but not in the elasmobranch. As a consequence of the Haldane effect, rbc intracellular pH was increased in the teleosts by deoxygenation but was unaltered in the elasmobranch. The results, by extrapolation, suggest that the rates of CO2 excretion in vivo are influenced by the magnitude of the Haldane effect and the extent of haemoglobin oxygenation during gill transit in addition to the intrinsic rate at which the rbc converts plasma HCO3- to CO2.",
keywords = "Anguilla anguilla, Band-3, Carbon dioxide excretion, Haemoglobin, Haldane effect, Oncorhynchus mykiss, Red blood cell, Scophthalmus maximus, Scyliorhinus canicula",
author = "Perry, {S. F.} and Wood, {C. M.} and Walsh, {P. J.} and S. Thomas",
year = "1996",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
pages = "121--130",
journal = "Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology; A: Comparative Physiology",
issn = "1095-6433",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fish red blood cell carbon dioxide transport in vitro

T2 - A comparative study

AU - Perry, S. F.

AU - Wood, C. M.

AU - Walsh, P. J.

AU - Thomas, S.

PY - 1996/12/1

Y1 - 1996/12/1

N2 - Red blood cell (rbc) carbon dioxide transport was examined in vitro in three teleosts (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Anguilla anguilla, Scophthalmus maximus) and an elasmobranch (Scyliorhinus canicula) using a radio-isotopic assay that measures the net conversion of plasma HCO3- to CO2. The experiments were designed to compare the intrinsic rates of rbc CO2 excretion and the impact of haemoglobin oxygenation/deoxygenation among the species. Under conditions simulating in vivo levels of plasma HCO3- and natural haematocrits, the rate of whole blood CO2 excretion varied between 14.0 μmol ml-1 h-1 (S. canicula) and 17.6 μmol ml-1 h-1 (O. mykiss). The rate of CO2 excretion in separated plasma was significantly greater in the dogfish, S. canicula. The contribution of the rbc to overall whole blood CO2 excretion was low in the dogfish (46 ± 6%) compared to the teleosts (trout, 71 ± 4%; turbot, 64 ± 5%; eel, 55 ± 3%). To eliminate the naturally occurring differences in haematocrit and plasma [HCO3-] as inter-specific variables, the rates of whole blood CO2 excretion were determined in blood that had been resuspended to constant [HCO3-] (5 mmol-1) and haematocrit (20%) in appropriate teleost and elasmobranch Ringer solutions. Under such normalized conditions, the rate of whole blood CO2 excretion was significantly higher in the turbot (22.4 ± 1.3 μmol ml-1 h-1) in comparison to the other species (16.4-18.4 μmol ml-1 h-1) and thus revealed a greater intrinsic rate of rbc CO2 excretion in the turbot. To study the contribution of Bohr protons, the rates of whole blood CO2 excretion were assessed in blood subjected to rapid oxygenation during the initial phase of the 3 min assay period. Rapid oxygenation significantly enhanced the rate of CO2 excretion in the teleosts but not in the elasmobranch. The extent of the increase provided by the rapid oxygenation of haemoglobin was a linear function of the extent of the Haldane effect, as quantified in each species from in vitro CO2 dissociation (combining) curves. Under steady-state conditions, deoxygenated blood exhibited greater rates of CO2 excretion than oxygenated blood in the teleosts but not in the elasmobranch. As a consequence of the Haldane effect, rbc intracellular pH was increased in the teleosts by deoxygenation but was unaltered in the elasmobranch. The results, by extrapolation, suggest that the rates of CO2 excretion in vivo are influenced by the magnitude of the Haldane effect and the extent of haemoglobin oxygenation during gill transit in addition to the intrinsic rate at which the rbc converts plasma HCO3- to CO2.

AB - Red blood cell (rbc) carbon dioxide transport was examined in vitro in three teleosts (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Anguilla anguilla, Scophthalmus maximus) and an elasmobranch (Scyliorhinus canicula) using a radio-isotopic assay that measures the net conversion of plasma HCO3- to CO2. The experiments were designed to compare the intrinsic rates of rbc CO2 excretion and the impact of haemoglobin oxygenation/deoxygenation among the species. Under conditions simulating in vivo levels of plasma HCO3- and natural haematocrits, the rate of whole blood CO2 excretion varied between 14.0 μmol ml-1 h-1 (S. canicula) and 17.6 μmol ml-1 h-1 (O. mykiss). The rate of CO2 excretion in separated plasma was significantly greater in the dogfish, S. canicula. The contribution of the rbc to overall whole blood CO2 excretion was low in the dogfish (46 ± 6%) compared to the teleosts (trout, 71 ± 4%; turbot, 64 ± 5%; eel, 55 ± 3%). To eliminate the naturally occurring differences in haematocrit and plasma [HCO3-] as inter-specific variables, the rates of whole blood CO2 excretion were determined in blood that had been resuspended to constant [HCO3-] (5 mmol-1) and haematocrit (20%) in appropriate teleost and elasmobranch Ringer solutions. Under such normalized conditions, the rate of whole blood CO2 excretion was significantly higher in the turbot (22.4 ± 1.3 μmol ml-1 h-1) in comparison to the other species (16.4-18.4 μmol ml-1 h-1) and thus revealed a greater intrinsic rate of rbc CO2 excretion in the turbot. To study the contribution of Bohr protons, the rates of whole blood CO2 excretion were assessed in blood subjected to rapid oxygenation during the initial phase of the 3 min assay period. Rapid oxygenation significantly enhanced the rate of CO2 excretion in the teleosts but not in the elasmobranch. The extent of the increase provided by the rapid oxygenation of haemoglobin was a linear function of the extent of the Haldane effect, as quantified in each species from in vitro CO2 dissociation (combining) curves. Under steady-state conditions, deoxygenated blood exhibited greater rates of CO2 excretion than oxygenated blood in the teleosts but not in the elasmobranch. As a consequence of the Haldane effect, rbc intracellular pH was increased in the teleosts by deoxygenation but was unaltered in the elasmobranch. The results, by extrapolation, suggest that the rates of CO2 excretion in vivo are influenced by the magnitude of the Haldane effect and the extent of haemoglobin oxygenation during gill transit in addition to the intrinsic rate at which the rbc converts plasma HCO3- to CO2.

KW - Anguilla anguilla

KW - Band-3

KW - Carbon dioxide excretion

KW - Haemoglobin

KW - Haldane effect

KW - Oncorhynchus mykiss

KW - Red blood cell

KW - Scophthalmus maximus

KW - Scyliorhinus canicula

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0001158687&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0001158687&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0001158687

VL - 113

SP - 121

EP - 130

JO - Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology; A: Comparative Physiology

JF - Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology; A: Comparative Physiology

SN - 1095-6433

IS - 2

ER -