Fertility, Employment, and Child-Care Costs

David M. Blau, Philip Robins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

117 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A sample of labor-market and birth histories is used to estimate the effects of child-care costs on employment and fertility decisions. A reduced-form empirical analysis is performed, which is based on hazard functions for transitions among various fertility-employment states. Higher child-care costs result in a lower birth rate for nonemployed women but not for employed women. Higher child-care costs also lead to an increase in the rate of leaving employment and a reduction in the rate of entering employment. The results suggest that potential behavioral effects of child-care subsidies could be significant and should be taken into account when alternative child-care policies are being debated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-299
Number of pages13
JournalDemography
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1989

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child care
fertility
costs
birth rate
subsidy
labor market
history

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography

Cite this

Fertility, Employment, and Child-Care Costs. / Blau, David M.; Robins, Philip.

In: Demography, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.05.1989, p. 287-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blau, David M. ; Robins, Philip. / Fertility, Employment, and Child-Care Costs. In: Demography. 1989 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 287-299.
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