Female cases of falling-out

A psychological evaluation of a small sample

Harriet P. Lefley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A small sample of American Black females who suffer from "falling-out" (seizure-like episodes with no evidence of organicity) were intensively interviewed and tested with a battery of psychological instruments. Results indicated that subjects were of good intelligence and did not have personality profiles of hysterics. Commonalities included depression which appeared characterological rather than reactive; emotional constriction: denial and repression as primary defense mechanisms; lack of creative and imaginal resources; sexual problems and pronounced hostility toward males; and a tendency toward withdrawal and isolation in daily life. "Falling-out" appeared to be a desperate mode of dealing with anxiety in a group with limited coping mechanisms and almost no external support systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-116
Number of pages2
JournalSocial Science and Medicine. Part B Medical Anthropology
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Repression (Psychology)
defense mechanism
Hostility
seizure
Defense Mechanisms
repression
Intelligence
Constriction
withdrawal
Personality
social isolation
intelligence
coping
personality
Seizures
Anxiety
Depression
Psychology
anxiety
lack

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Social Psychology
  • Development
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Female cases of falling-out : A psychological evaluation of a small sample. / Lefley, Harriet P.

In: Social Science and Medicine. Part B Medical Anthropology, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.01.1979, p. 115-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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