Feasibility of using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) to determine the impacts of cleaning techniques on historic stone structures

Richard R. Wingrove, Pat Blackwelder, Matthew J. Lynn

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

The oiling of cultural sites has occurred in past spills (USCG, 1994; Wooley and Haggarty, 1995) and will continue to be a problem in future spills. Oiled stone structures must be cleaned to minimize damage and return them to an aesthetic standard, yet little research has been conducted on the potential impacts of the cleaning process. Unfortunately, the cleaning process can cause negative impacts, perhaps even altering the chemical makeup of the stone that can compromise the structure. Because visual inspection is usually the sole method of determining the effectiveness and negative impacts of the cleaning process, only obvious surficial effects can be detected and not chemical changes to the rock.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages3021-3025
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event2005 International Oil Spill Conference, IOSC 2005 - Miami Beach, FL, United States
Duration: May 15 2005May 19 2005

Other

Other2005 International Oil Spill Conference, IOSC 2005
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityMiami Beach, FL
Period5/15/055/19/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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