Feasibility of Using an iPod Touch Device and Acceptability of a Stigma Reduction Intervention with HIV-Infected Women in the Deep South

Michael V. Relf, Susan G. Silva, Megan Scull Williams, Elizabeth Moore, Joyell Arscott, Courtney Caiola, Julie Barroso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As with many infectious diseases throughout history, stigma is a part of the trajectory of the HIV disease process. HIV-related stigma impedes women from being tested for HIV. Once infected, HIV-related stigma hinders women from disclosing their HIV status to sexual partners and health care providers, engaging in medical care, effectively self-managing the disease after infection, and adhering to anti-retroviral therapy. After three decades of the HIV epidemic, no evidenced-based, culturally relevant, gender-specific interventions exist to help women infected with HIV manage the stigma associated with HIV infection. This manuscript reports the feasibility of using an iPod touch device and acceptability of a stigma reduction intervention with HIV-infected women in the Deep South in a mixed-method, randomized clinical trial. Results from the study demonstrate that it is feasible to utilize an iPod touch device to deliver an HIV-related stigma intervention to women. Further, women report that the HIV-related stigma intervention is acceptable and meaningful.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1896-1904
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume19
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 14 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Touch
HIV
Equipment and Supplies
Sexual Partners
Reproductive Health
Self Care
Health Personnel
HIV Infections
Communicable Diseases
Randomized Controlled Trials
History

Keywords

  • Acceptability
  • Feasibility
  • HIV
  • HIV-related stigma
  • iPod touch
  • Stigma
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Feasibility of Using an iPod Touch Device and Acceptability of a Stigma Reduction Intervention with HIV-Infected Women in the Deep South. / Relf, Michael V.; Silva, Susan G.; Williams, Megan Scull; Moore, Elizabeth; Arscott, Joyell; Caiola, Courtney; Barroso, Julie.

In: AIDS and Behavior, Vol. 19, No. 10, 14.10.2015, p. 1896-1904.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Relf, Michael V. ; Silva, Susan G. ; Williams, Megan Scull ; Moore, Elizabeth ; Arscott, Joyell ; Caiola, Courtney ; Barroso, Julie. / Feasibility of Using an iPod Touch Device and Acceptability of a Stigma Reduction Intervention with HIV-Infected Women in the Deep South. In: AIDS and Behavior. 2015 ; Vol. 19, No. 10. pp. 1896-1904.
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