Feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary impact of telemedicine-administered cognitive behavioral therapy for adherence and depression among African American women living with HIV in the rural South

Anna Junkins, Christina Psaros, Corilyn Ott, Andres Azuero, Crystal Chapman Lambert, Karen Cropsey, Robert Savage, Jessica E. Haberer, Steven A. Safren, Mirjam Colette Kempf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Women living with HIV are disproportionally affected by depression and mental healthcare access. A pilot feasibility trial using videoconferencing compared cognitive behavioral therapy for antiretroviral therapy adherence and depression (N = 11) to supportive psychotherapy (N = 11). Participants completed 10–12 weekly therapy sessions and 6-month follow-up. Retention at 6 months was 95 percent. Depression symptoms significantly decreased in both arms; antiretroviral therapy adherence remained high as measured via self-report and Wisepill. Satisfaction with intervention components was high; videoconferencing was highly acceptable and comparable to face-to-face counseling. This study demonstrates the feasibility of telemedicine-administered psychotherapy addressing mental health needs among women living with HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • adherence
  • cognitive behavioral therapy
  • depression
  • HIV
  • women’s health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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