Fatalism, medical mistrust, and pretreatment health-related quality of life in ethnically diverse prostate cancer patients

Natalie Escobio Bustillo, Heather L. Mcginty, Jason R. Dahn, Betina Yanez, Michael H Antoni, Bruce Kava, Frank J. Penedo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Few studies have examined the impact of cultural processes prevalent in minority ethnic groups such as cancer fatalism and medical mistrust on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following a cancer diagnosis. The present study examined relationships among ethnicity, HRQoL, and two possible cultural vulnerability factors-fatalistic attitudes and medical mistrust-among an ethnically diverse sample of men with prostate cancer (PC) prior to undergoing active treatment. Methods: A total of 268 men with localized PC (30% African American, 29% Hispanic, and 41% non-Hispanic White) were assessed cross-sectionally prior to active treatment. Path analyses examined relationships among ethnicity, vulnerability factors, and HRQoL. Results: Ethnicity was not related to HRQoL after controlling for relevant covariates. Hispanic men reported greater cancer fatalism compared with non-Hispanic White men (β=0.15, p=0.03), and both Hispanics (β=0.19, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsycho-Oncology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

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