Family medicine physicians' advice about use of nonconventional modalities for menopausal symptom management

Kathryn Grant, Mary Ann Burg, Kathryn Fraser, Serena Gui, Shae Graham Kosch, Barry Nierenberg, Oliver Oyama, Heidi Allespach, Kimberly Sibille, Timothy Spruill, Virginia Swartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: This study explores the beliefs and practices of family medicine physicians regarding the use of nonconventional modalities for menopausal symptom management. Methods: Anonymous self-administered questionnaires were distributed to faculty and residents from eight participating family medicine residency programs around Florida, with an overall response rate of 66% (212 respondents). The survey explored what physicians report about patterns of patient inquiries and their responses to patients' inquiries about nonconventional modalities for specific menopausal symptoms and what physicians' report on their advice to patients about using specific herbs and supplements for menopausal symptom relief. Results: Behavioral approaches were encouraged more than herbal therapies, acupuncture, and body therapies for the treatment of most of the menopausal symptoms. However, the most frequent response category was No advice. Resident physicians were significantly more likely than faculty to encourage acupuncture. Faculty physicians were more likely than residents to recommend particular herbal remedies. The majority of the respondents believed there was not sufficient evidence for recommending any of the herbs and supplements listed. Conclusions: These data reveal some important trends about how family medicine physicians respond to nontraditional approaches for menopausal symptom management. Because family medicine physicians typically receive some training in behavioral and psychotherapeutic approaches and there is some evidence for the effectiveness of behavioral strategies in menopausal symptom management, it is not surprising that they are more likely to endorse these approaches. Most family medicine physicians, however, have little or no training in the other nonconventional modalities, and our data show that these modalities received lower levels of endorsement, suggesting that physicians are not clear on their advantages or disadvantages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-525
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Family Physicians
Medicine
Physicians
Acupuncture Therapy
Phytotherapy
Acupuncture
Internship and Residency
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Grant, K., Burg, M. A., Fraser, K., Gui, S., Kosch, S. G., Nierenberg, B., ... Swartz, V. (2007). Family medicine physicians' advice about use of nonconventional modalities for menopausal symptom management. Journal of Women's Health, 16(4), 517-525. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2006.0268

Family medicine physicians' advice about use of nonconventional modalities for menopausal symptom management. / Grant, Kathryn; Burg, Mary Ann; Fraser, Kathryn; Gui, Serena; Kosch, Shae Graham; Nierenberg, Barry; Oyama, Oliver; Allespach, Heidi; Sibille, Kimberly; Spruill, Timothy; Swartz, Virginia.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 16, No. 4, 05.2007, p. 517-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grant, K, Burg, MA, Fraser, K, Gui, S, Kosch, SG, Nierenberg, B, Oyama, O, Allespach, H, Sibille, K, Spruill, T & Swartz, V 2007, 'Family medicine physicians' advice about use of nonconventional modalities for menopausal symptom management', Journal of Women's Health, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 517-525. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2006.0268
Grant, Kathryn ; Burg, Mary Ann ; Fraser, Kathryn ; Gui, Serena ; Kosch, Shae Graham ; Nierenberg, Barry ; Oyama, Oliver ; Allespach, Heidi ; Sibille, Kimberly ; Spruill, Timothy ; Swartz, Virginia. / Family medicine physicians' advice about use of nonconventional modalities for menopausal symptom management. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2007 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 517-525.
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