Failure to Recover from Proactive Semantic Interference and Abnormal Limbic Connectivity in Asymptomatic, Middle-Aged Offspring of Patients with Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

Stella M. Śanchez, Carolina Abulafia, Barbara Duarte-Abritta, M. Soledad Ladŕon De Guevara, Mariana N. Castro, Lucas Drucaroff, Gustavo Sevlever, Charles B. Nemeroff, Daniel E. Vigo, David A. Loewenstein, Mirta F. Villarreal, Salvador M. Guinjoan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: We have obtained previous evidence of limbic dysfunction in middle-Aged, asymptomatic offspring of lateonset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) patients, and failure to recover from proactive semantic interference has been shown to be a sensitive cognitive test in other groups at risk for LOAD. Objective: To assess the effects of specific proactive semantic interference deficits as they relate to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neocortical and limbic functional connectivity in middle aged offspring of individuals with LOAD (O-LOAD) and age-equivalent controls. Methods:We examined 21O-LOADand 20 controls without family history of neurodegenerative disorders (CS) on traditional measures of cognitive functioning and the LASSI-L, a novel semantic interference test uniquely sensitive to the failure to recover from proactive interference (frPSI). Cognitive tests then were correlated to fMRI connectivity of seeds located in entorhinal cortex and anterodorsal thalamic nuclei among O-LOAD and CS participants. Results: Relative to CS, O-LOAD participants evidenced lower connectivity between entorhinal cortex and orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate, and anterior temporal cortex. In the offspring of LOAD patients, LASSI-L measures of frPSI were inversely associated with connectivity between anterodorsal thalamus and contralateral posterior cingulate. Intrusions on the task related to frPSI were inversely correlated with a widespread connectivity network involving hippocampal, insular, posterior cingulate, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, along with precunei and anterior thalamus in this group. Different patterns of connectivity associated with frPSI were observed among controls. Conclusion: The present results suggest that both semantic interference deficits and connectivity abnormalities might reflect limbic circuit dysfunction as a very early clinical signature of LOAD pathology, as previously demonstrated for other limbic phenotypes, such as sleep and circadian alterations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1183-1193
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume60
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Entorhinal cortex
  • functional connectivity
  • late-onset Alzheimer's disease
  • limbic
  • proactive semantic interference
  • thalamus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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