Failure prediction for textile composites via micromechanics

Brian Cox, Qingda Yang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The question of failure criteria for textile composites is taken up, with reference to the micromechanics of known failure mechanisms in broad classes of 2D and 3D textile composites. Of primary importance is the definition of the measure of local stress or strain that should be compared against a putative material constant to predict local damage. In most prior work, some combination of strain or stress components evaluated at a single point has been used. Due to the complexity and inevitable irregularity of textile composites, this approach is not favoured. Instead, micromechanical considerations recommend using strains averaged over gauge volumes whose dimensions are greater than or equal to approximately half the width dimensions of a single tow. Engineering tests that can be used for calibration are suggested but remain to be proven repeatable and consistent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Materials Division (Publication) MD
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Pages189-195
Number of pages7
Volume98
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes
Event2003 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress - Washington, DC., United States
Duration: Nov 15 2003Nov 21 2003

Other

Other2003 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress
CountryUnited States
CityWashington, DC.
Period11/15/0311/21/03

Fingerprint

Micromechanics
Textiles
Composite materials
Gages
Calibration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Cox, B., & Yang, Q. (2003). Failure prediction for textile composites via micromechanics. In American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Materials Division (Publication) MD (Vol. 98, pp. 189-195). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2003-43491

Failure prediction for textile composites via micromechanics. / Cox, Brian; Yang, Qingda.

American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Materials Division (Publication) MD. Vol. 98 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2003. p. 189-195.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Cox, B & Yang, Q 2003, Failure prediction for textile composites via micromechanics. in American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Materials Division (Publication) MD. vol. 98, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), pp. 189-195, 2003 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress, Washington, DC., United States, 11/15/03. https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2003-43491
Cox B, Yang Q. Failure prediction for textile composites via micromechanics. In American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Materials Division (Publication) MD. Vol. 98. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2003. p. 189-195 https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2003-43491
Cox, Brian ; Yang, Qingda. / Failure prediction for textile composites via micromechanics. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Materials Division (Publication) MD. Vol. 98 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2003. pp. 189-195
@inproceedings{9f3b5bc3796a4ce19205a3ac0f3d0f58,
title = "Failure prediction for textile composites via micromechanics",
abstract = "The question of failure criteria for textile composites is taken up, with reference to the micromechanics of known failure mechanisms in broad classes of 2D and 3D textile composites. Of primary importance is the definition of the measure of local stress or strain that should be compared against a putative material constant to predict local damage. In most prior work, some combination of strain or stress components evaluated at a single point has been used. Due to the complexity and inevitable irregularity of textile composites, this approach is not favoured. Instead, micromechanical considerations recommend using strains averaged over gauge volumes whose dimensions are greater than or equal to approximately half the width dimensions of a single tow. Engineering tests that can be used for calibration are suggested but remain to be proven repeatable and consistent.",
author = "Brian Cox and Qingda Yang",
year = "2003",
doi = "10.1115/IMECE2003-43491",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "98",
pages = "189--195",
booktitle = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Materials Division (Publication) MD",
publisher = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Failure prediction for textile composites via micromechanics

AU - Cox, Brian

AU - Yang, Qingda

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - The question of failure criteria for textile composites is taken up, with reference to the micromechanics of known failure mechanisms in broad classes of 2D and 3D textile composites. Of primary importance is the definition of the measure of local stress or strain that should be compared against a putative material constant to predict local damage. In most prior work, some combination of strain or stress components evaluated at a single point has been used. Due to the complexity and inevitable irregularity of textile composites, this approach is not favoured. Instead, micromechanical considerations recommend using strains averaged over gauge volumes whose dimensions are greater than or equal to approximately half the width dimensions of a single tow. Engineering tests that can be used for calibration are suggested but remain to be proven repeatable and consistent.

AB - The question of failure criteria for textile composites is taken up, with reference to the micromechanics of known failure mechanisms in broad classes of 2D and 3D textile composites. Of primary importance is the definition of the measure of local stress or strain that should be compared against a putative material constant to predict local damage. In most prior work, some combination of strain or stress components evaluated at a single point has been used. Due to the complexity and inevitable irregularity of textile composites, this approach is not favoured. Instead, micromechanical considerations recommend using strains averaged over gauge volumes whose dimensions are greater than or equal to approximately half the width dimensions of a single tow. Engineering tests that can be used for calibration are suggested but remain to be proven repeatable and consistent.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1842421343&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1842421343&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1115/IMECE2003-43491

DO - 10.1115/IMECE2003-43491

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:1842421343

VL - 98

SP - 189

EP - 195

BT - American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Materials Division (Publication) MD

PB - American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)

ER -