Factors Associated With Receipt of Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

Laura A. McClure, Daniel A. Sussman, Monique N. Hernandez, Stacey L. Tannenbaum, Raphael L. Yechieli, Judith M. Bonner, D. D. Zheng, David J. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE:: Appropriate treatment for cancer is vital to increasing the likelihood of survival; however, for rectal cancer, there are demonstrated disparities in receipt of treatment by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. We evaluated factors associated with receipt of appropriate radiation therapy for rectal cancer using data from the Florida Cancer Data System that had been previously enriched with detailed treatment information collected from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Comparative Effectiveness Research study. This treatment information is not routinely available in cancer registry data and represents a unique data resource. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Using multivariable regression, we evaluated factors associated with receiving radiation therapy among rectal cancer cases stage II/III. Our sample (n=403) included cases diagnosed in Florida in 2011 who were 18 years and older. Cases clinically staged as 0/I/IV were excluded. RESULTS:: Older age (odds ratio=0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-0.97), the presence of one or more comorbidities (0.61; 0.39-0.96), and receipt of surgical intervention (0.44; 0.22-0.90) were associated with lack of radiation. CONCLUSIONS:: In this cohort of patients, sociodemographic factors such as race/ethnicity, insurance status, and socioeconomic status, did not influence the receipt of radiation. Further research is needed, however, to understand why aging, greater comorbidity, and having surgery present a barrier to radiation therapy, particularly given that it is a well-tolerated treatment in most patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 22 2015

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Rectal Neoplasms
Radiotherapy
Social Class
Comorbidity
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Radiation
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Insurance Coverage
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Information Systems
Registries
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Survival
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Factors Associated With Receipt of Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer. / McClure, Laura A.; Sussman, Daniel A.; Hernandez, Monique N.; Tannenbaum, Stacey L.; Yechieli, Raphael L.; Bonner, Judith M.; Zheng, D. D.; Lee, David J.

In: American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials, 22.12.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "PURPOSE:: Appropriate treatment for cancer is vital to increasing the likelihood of survival; however, for rectal cancer, there are demonstrated disparities in receipt of treatment by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. We evaluated factors associated with receipt of appropriate radiation therapy for rectal cancer using data from the Florida Cancer Data System that had been previously enriched with detailed treatment information collected from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Comparative Effectiveness Research study. This treatment information is not routinely available in cancer registry data and represents a unique data resource. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Using multivariable regression, we evaluated factors associated with receiving radiation therapy among rectal cancer cases stage II/III. Our sample (n=403) included cases diagnosed in Florida in 2011 who were 18 years and older. Cases clinically staged as 0/I/IV were excluded. RESULTS:: Older age (odds ratio=0.96; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.94-0.97), the presence of one or more comorbidities (0.61; 0.39-0.96), and receipt of surgical intervention (0.44; 0.22-0.90) were associated with lack of radiation. CONCLUSIONS:: In this cohort of patients, sociodemographic factors such as race/ethnicity, insurance status, and socioeconomic status, did not influence the receipt of radiation. Further research is needed, however, to understand why aging, greater comorbidity, and having surgery present a barrier to radiation therapy, particularly given that it is a well-tolerated treatment in most patients.",
author = "McClure, {Laura A.} and Sussman, {Daniel A.} and Hernandez, {Monique N.} and Tannenbaum, {Stacey L.} and Yechieli, {Raphael L.} and Bonner, {Judith M.} and Zheng, {D. D.} and Lee, {David J.}",
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AU - McClure, Laura A.

AU - Sussman, Daniel A.

AU - Hernandez, Monique N.

AU - Tannenbaum, Stacey L.

AU - Yechieli, Raphael L.

AU - Bonner, Judith M.

AU - Zheng, D. D.

AU - Lee, David J.

PY - 2015/12/22

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N2 - PURPOSE:: Appropriate treatment for cancer is vital to increasing the likelihood of survival; however, for rectal cancer, there are demonstrated disparities in receipt of treatment by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. We evaluated factors associated with receipt of appropriate radiation therapy for rectal cancer using data from the Florida Cancer Data System that had been previously enriched with detailed treatment information collected from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Comparative Effectiveness Research study. This treatment information is not routinely available in cancer registry data and represents a unique data resource. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Using multivariable regression, we evaluated factors associated with receiving radiation therapy among rectal cancer cases stage II/III. Our sample (n=403) included cases diagnosed in Florida in 2011 who were 18 years and older. Cases clinically staged as 0/I/IV were excluded. RESULTS:: Older age (odds ratio=0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-0.97), the presence of one or more comorbidities (0.61; 0.39-0.96), and receipt of surgical intervention (0.44; 0.22-0.90) were associated with lack of radiation. CONCLUSIONS:: In this cohort of patients, sociodemographic factors such as race/ethnicity, insurance status, and socioeconomic status, did not influence the receipt of radiation. Further research is needed, however, to understand why aging, greater comorbidity, and having surgery present a barrier to radiation therapy, particularly given that it is a well-tolerated treatment in most patients.

AB - PURPOSE:: Appropriate treatment for cancer is vital to increasing the likelihood of survival; however, for rectal cancer, there are demonstrated disparities in receipt of treatment by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. We evaluated factors associated with receipt of appropriate radiation therapy for rectal cancer using data from the Florida Cancer Data System that had been previously enriched with detailed treatment information collected from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Comparative Effectiveness Research study. This treatment information is not routinely available in cancer registry data and represents a unique data resource. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Using multivariable regression, we evaluated factors associated with receiving radiation therapy among rectal cancer cases stage II/III. Our sample (n=403) included cases diagnosed in Florida in 2011 who were 18 years and older. Cases clinically staged as 0/I/IV were excluded. RESULTS:: Older age (odds ratio=0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-0.97), the presence of one or more comorbidities (0.61; 0.39-0.96), and receipt of surgical intervention (0.44; 0.22-0.90) were associated with lack of radiation. CONCLUSIONS:: In this cohort of patients, sociodemographic factors such as race/ethnicity, insurance status, and socioeconomic status, did not influence the receipt of radiation. Further research is needed, however, to understand why aging, greater comorbidity, and having surgery present a barrier to radiation therapy, particularly given that it is a well-tolerated treatment in most patients.

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