Factors Associated With Psychosocial Illness Impact Among Black/African American and Hispanic Older Women Living With HIV

Evelyn Iriarte, Rosina Cianelli, Natalia Villegas, Giovanna De Oliveira, Christine Toledo, Lindsay Smith, Jose Guillermo Castro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: In 2018, one in six newly diagnosed individuals with HIV in the United States were adults aged 50 years and older, 24% were women, and 60% were Black/African American and Hispanic (42% and 18%, respectively). Objectives: This study aims to examine the factors associated with HIV psychosocial illness impact among Black/African American and Hispanic older women living with HIV. Method: Guided by the socioecological model, a secondary data analysis design with cross-sectional data that included 138 Black/African American and Hispanic women aged 50 years and older was conducted. Results: Higher levels of avoidant coping, depressive symptoms, negative self-perception of health, and decreased social support were significant factors associated with HIV psychosocial illness impact among this sample. Conclusions: Findings from this study can contribute to identifying solutions to prevent and decrease these negative factors associated with HIV psychosocial illness impact among Black/African American and Hispanic older women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • depressive symptoms
  • HIV
  • psychosocial factors
  • social support
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

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